Campus Map to A-kan Building (in Japanese)    Travel Directions (in Japanese)  *  Walking Map from JR Oasa Station (in English) *


2014年度札幌学院大学英語教育研究会--第14回CALLワークショップ
Joint JACET Hokkaido Chapter and JALT Hokkaido Chapter Meeting

CALL-Plus Workshop 2014

Theme:  Collaborative Teaching

Saturday, 8 November 2014   10:00 am – 5:00 pm

Sapporo Gakuin University, A-kan Building, 2nd Floor, Ebetsu, Hokkaido, Japan
Fee:  500 yen for materials and refreshments, JALT & JACET members free

Call for PresentationsSubmit your proposal here--Now Closed 
Deadline for proposal submissions extended to:  October 7th
For information:  Contact Don Hinkelman: hinkel at sgu.ac.jp or Lisa Mizushima: lisa at sgu.ac.jp

Presentation Schedule: Go here for Final Schedule
Participant Evaluation Survey: Go to this form 

Presentation Photos:  Go to this site
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2014 Keynote Presentation:

Microsoft Word - 2014Callplusworkshopflyer-gakkakaigi4.docx

 Unleashing Potential! 可能性を引き出す
Changing Students' Attitudes Towards English Through Teacher Collaboration

教 員のコラボレーションを通して学生の英語に対する姿勢を変える


Microsoft Word - 2014Callplusworkshopflyer-gakkakaigi4.docx

New data shows that almost 43% of high school students in Hokkaido do not understand what is being taught to them during English class. Furthermore, over 53% of high school students in Hokkaido dislike learning English. This presentation will look at addressing the problem by outlining a course made by using a fresh approach to teacher collaboration, which strikes a balance between teacher independence and teacher interdependence. In addition, the teaching team will examine the practicalities of designing a university course in such a way, as well as the advantages and disadvantages for both the students and the teachers involved.

新しいデーターは、北海道の高校生の約43%が英語の 授業で教えられている内容を 理解出来ていないということを示唆している。さらに、53%を超える北海道の高校 生が英語を学ぶのが嫌いであると示している。このプレゼンテーションは、教員のコ ラボレションに対して教員の主体性と相互依存のバランスを図るという斬新なアプロー チを用いることでコース の概略を述べて考察している 。また、このような方法で大 学のコースの設定の実用性と 、関係する学生と教員の両者 の長所や短所にも同様に考察 している。

Presenters: Haruhiko Tsuri, Peter Schinckel, Helen Takahashi, Kate Sato, and Matt Cotter; faculty of Sapporo Gakuin University.



2013 Theme and Keynote Presentation:
"Flip the Classroom"

The Movement for Multimedia Study Before Class

Based on the book by Jonathan Bergman and Aaron Sams


“Flip teaching (or flipped classroom) is a form of blended learning in which students learn new content online by watching video lectures, usually at home, and what used to be homework (assigned problems) is now done in class with teacher offering more personalized guidance and interaction with students, instead of lecturing. This is also known as backwards classroom, reverse instruction, flipping the classroom and reverse teaching. The traditional pattern of teaching has been to assign students to read textbooks and work on problem sets outside school, while listening to lectures and taking test in class. In flip teaching, the students first study the topic by themselves, typically using video lessons prepared by the teacher.  Classroom time is for the students to apply the knowledge by solving problems and doing practical work.  The teacher tutors the students when they become stuck, rather than imparting the initial lesson.”  (quoted from--http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flip_teaching)


Flipped Classroomとは何 か

Flipped Classroomとは、日本語だと「反転授 業」や「教室をひっくり返す」と訳される。には、さっと裏返すや、ひっ くり返すという意味があるから、教室を裏返すというわけだ。どういう意味で、教室をひっくり返すと いっているかと言うと、教室と家の役割がテクノロジーによって入れ替わることを指している。従来の 教育で行われている、教室=先生から講義を受ける場、家庭=持ち帰って自主的に学ぶ場、という役割 が逆転するという意味だ。なぜこのという考え方が注目されて きたかというと、動画コンテンツ などの講義が無料で開放されていくことにともなって、教室(リアルの場)が見直され始めたからだ。従来の教室のように、時間の 決められた中で、大人数に同じことを教えるというのが、生徒個人個人にとってみれば最適ではない が、全体最適の中でやむを得ずそういった形式がとられていた。しかし、動画コンテンツであれば生徒 それぞれが自分のペースで理解出来るまで学習出来る。質問への遠慮もいらない。分からないところは 何度も見るということが遠慮なく出来る。つまり学習の個別化が用意になる。

http://edtech-media.com/2013/04/01/edtech関連ワードno-2-flipped-classroomと はインフォグラフィックは、「Flipped Classroom」より引用:http://www.knewton.com/flipped-classroom/

-- Tentative Schedule of Presentations for 2013--
   Refreshments and Registration: from 9:30 am, SGU A-kan, 2F
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1. Moodle Training Workshop: (英 語 版, 日本語版)  (10:10-12:10)
- Peter Ruthven-Stuart, Moodle as a Flipping Medium: Basic Moodle for Blending into Language Teaching
- Ken Friesen, Experienced Moodling for Wiki, Quiz, Forums, Groups, Grouping, Conditional Activities, Metacourses, and Gradebook.
- Martin Meadows, PoodLL & The Nanogongs: Video and Audio Recording in Moodle
2. Assisting Pre-service teachers through English Language Classroom Corpora: Noriaki Katagiri (10:10-10:50)

3. ERSA--A Model to Improve Japanese Students' Willingness to Communicate in English: Ibrahim Farouck (10:10-10:50)
4. Flipped Classroom Approach through a Social Network Site: Karen Cline -Kateyama (10:50-11:30)
5. Online Writing Assignments and Plagiarism: Bob Gettings (11:30-12:10)
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6. Flip the Classroom: Gimmick or Revolution?  Don Hinkelman and Goh Kawai  (1:00-2:00pm)
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7. What do you think about the "future" of education: Kaori Maeda, in Japanese (2:10-2:55)
8. The Flipped Science Class: A Case Study in English-speaking Environments, Megan Shaffer (2:10-2:55)
9. Using MoodleReader for ER in and out of the Classroom: Glen Hill
(2:10-2:55)
10. What is Appropriate Technology: Lessons from Africa and Tohoku: Helen Takahashi (3:00-3:45)
11. Online International Exchanges: Eric Hagley (3:00-3:45)
12. Online Learning of Introductory Technical Writing Using Figures and Tables: Goh Kawai and Akio Ohnishi  (3:00-3:45)
13. University Students of the Future: What are their classrooms like now?  Kate Sato (3:50-4:10)
14. Collaborative Conversational Class Administration--Online and In-person:
David Hyre (3:50-4:30) 
15. What are the Consequences of Limited Term Employment Contracts?  Matt Cotter and Peter Schinckel
(3:50-4:10)
16. Speed up Student Feedback with Text Expansion Applications: David Campbell (4:10-4:40)
17. Ways to Flip with WorldLink's Moodle Materials: Tom Goetz (4:10-4:30)
18. Vocabulary and Phrase Learning Online: Haidee Thomson (4:40-5:00)
19. Flip the Classroom with Fifty Fifty: Ken Friesen (4:30-5:00)
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Networking Party: 6:00~8:30  (Near Sapporo Station--3500 yen, no reservation needed)

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2012 Keynote Presentation:
"The Future School Project in Hokkaido"
Kaori Maeda, Ishikari Kounan Elementary School


プレゼンテーション要約:In April, 2010, the Ministry of Education commenced a three year Future School Project involving ten elementary schools across Japan including Ishikari Kounan Shogakko--Hokkaido's only participating school. The project involves promoting cooperative education through the use of tablet computers, interactive whiteboards and appropriate educational platforms such as education clouds.  Kaori Maeda is a teacher at Ishikari Kounan Elementary School and an active member of the Future Schools Project team. She will give an overview of the Future School Project, discuss her school's involvement and provide examples of classroom lessons using ICT including examples of how her students interact with students at other schools. Presented in Japanese.

 2010年4月に、総務省は、日本の中で10校の小学校を選び、「フューチャースクールプロジェクト」 を3年計画で始めた。石狩市立紅南小学校は、北海道で唯一のフューチャースクールである。このプロジェクトは、全教室に、校 内無線LAN、IWBが設置され、児童全員にタブレットパソコンが与え、全ての情報データをクラウドに置いている。こ のプロジェクトは、子どもたちの学び合い、協働教育を推進することをねらいとしている。
 2011年4月より、文部科学省は、全てのフューチャースクールを対象として、「学びのイノベーション プロジェクト」を三年計画で始めている。このプロジェクトのねらいは、生徒用のデジタル教科書を使って学習する研究である。前 多香織は、石狩市立紅南小学校の教師であり、フューチャースクールプロジェクトに積極的に取り組み多くの実践している。彼 女は、フューチャースクールの自分の教室でどのような指導を行い、子どもたちの可能性をのばすのかについて語り、実践を紹介 する。

-- Tentative Schedule of Presentations--
1. Moodle Training Workshop: (英語 版) Peter Ruthven-Stuart, Bob Gettings (日本語版) Eric Hagley (10:10-11:40)
2. Moodle Reader Workshop: Don Hinkelman, Geordie McGarty, Kenley Freisen, Tim Grose, Martin Meadows (10:10-11:45)

3. English Central in the Classroom: Ken Freisen and Geordie McGarty (11:00-11:40)
4. Relaying Messages: An Age Old Language Activity Using Modern Day Technology: Matthew Cotter (11:30-11:50)
5. How to Create a Nine-Week Self-paced Listening Activity: David Campbell  (11:40-12:00)
6. An Assessment of Extensive Reading for Freshman at Sapporo University: Phillip Radcliffe (11:40-12:00)
7. Techniques for Classroom Management and Measuring Class Participation: Helen Takahashi (11:40-12:10)
8. The Future School Project in Hokkaido: Kaori Maeda (1:00-2:05)
9. Teachers Helping Teachers: Laos, Baseball and You: Jerry Halvorsen (2:10-2:50)
10. How In-house TOEIC Preparation Materials with Moodle Improved TOEIC Scores: Ibrahim Farouck (2:10-2:50)
11. Bringing a Printed Textbook and DVD online: Akio Ohnishi  (2:10-2:50)
12. Writing Feedback Generator: Brian Nielsen (2:55-3:35)
13. Making it Easy for Students Around the World to Communicate via Moodle: Eric Hagley  (2:55-3:35)
14. Discussion Class Format: Communicative Lessons for Low Proficiency to High: Martin Murphy (2:55-3:35)
15. Study of Developing Multi-Touch Based Digital Textbooks: Norihito Kawana (3:40-4:20)
16. Options for Energizing Sustained Reading Passages: Tim Grose  (3:40-4:20)
17. Five Minute Japanese Contest Speeches by Non-Natives for EFL Motivation: David Hyre (3:40-4:20)

18. Experience the World without Leaving Your Classroom: Peter Ruthven-Stuart (4:25-4:55)
19. Creating an Autonomous Learning Center: Trials & Triumphs: Elizabeth Yoshikawa (4:25-4:55)
20. Using Poster Presentations to Improve Students Speaking and Presentation Skills: Peter Schinckel
(4:25-4:55)
Networking Party: 5:00-7:00~  (Tsubohachi, Bunkyodai--approx. 3000-4000 yen, no reservation needed)    

Download abstracts (presentation summaries) here for further information



15 October 2011 Schedule:

2011 Workshop Participants Survey


Registration from 9:30am (refreshments available)

Session I:  Morning Workshops   10:10 – 11:40
1.  Moodle Training Workshop (Beginners and Experienced Levels): Eric Hagley and Bob Gettings  (Room A-201)
2.  Moodlereader Training Workshop , Don Hinkelman and Ken Friesen (Room C-301)

Session II:  Morning Presentations   11:40 – 12:10
3.   A Four-skills Activity Using the Moodle Database Module: David Campbell, Obihiro Univ. of Agric. and Vet. Medicine (Room A-201)
4.   Student Reactions to the Moodle Reader: Martin Meadows, Nayoro City University  (Room C-301)

Session III:  Keynote Presentation  1:00—2:05
5.   Listening Strategies in Self-Study, Computer-based Listening Modules:  (Room A-201)
      Goh Kawai, Hokkaido University, Center for Language Learning

Session IV:   Afternoon Presentations  2:10—2:50
6.  Student Project: Creating Online Original Dubbed Cartoons: Geordie McGarty, Sapporo Gakuin University/Moon Tree School (A-201)
7.  Multi-cultural Skype-assisted Communications between America and Japan: Andy Johnson, Future University Hakodate  (C-301)
8.  Courteous Actions Speak Louder than Words:  Katherine Mansoor-Fuji, Hokkaido Information University  (C-312)

Session V:  Afternoon Presentations  2:55—3:35
9.   Using Technology to Improve Oral Testing Techniques: Eric Hagley, Muroran Institute of Technology (A-201)
10.  Integrating Video Assessment into an Oral Presentation Course: Joel Rian, Geordie McGarty, Don Hinkelman, Sapporo Gakuin University (C-301)

Session VI:  Afternoon Presentations  3:40—4:20
11.   Very Easily-made Pronunciation Videos for Computers or 'Smart' Devices : J. David Hyre, Sapporo International Junior College  (A-201)
12.   Useful Sites for Teaching Global Issues, Tim Grose, Sapporo Gakuin University  (C-301)

Session VII:  Panel Discussion  4:20—5:00
13.  Panel Discussion-CALL, Where Next?   Goh Kawai, Don Hinkelman, Andrew Johnson     (A-201)
Networking Party: 5:00 - 7:00    Tsubohachi Restaurant, Bunkyodai  (about 3000 yen)


 
2011 Keynote Presentation:
Designing online learning experiences for audio-visual language learning
Goh Kawai, Hokkaido University, Center for Language Learning --
河 合 剛   (北海道大学 外国語教育センター)

The man on the left (who owns an airplane factory in Florida) is describing how a recent hurricane destroyed an airplane hangar and the aircraft within. The man gestures with his arms to describe how the walls of the building collapsed. His audience understands what happened, and he understands that his audience understands. Hence he does not finish his sentence "And the whole big building, block walls and all ...". He never says the verb "collapsed". Instead, he continues his story.

The above example shows that gestures occasionally convey visual information that is not present in the audio medium. Although CALL has the technical capacity to facilitate audio-visual (AV) language learning, learning experiences for AV comprehension have not increased. Narrated programs such as television programs about art, history, and science are popular, but material that teach the complementary nature of verbal and non-verbal language is surprisingly scarce. The fact that our students rarely gesture when talking or giving presentation is evidence of the dearth of AV language learning.

Gestures are not universal. There seem to be at least geographic, vocational, and gender differences even within English. Perhaps each learner can view several styles and choose their production target (i.e., the style that learner prefers to adopt), while being exposed to multiple styles in order to hone receptive skills. TED talks (http://www.ted.com/) may be a possible source to collect various gesture styles. In my talk, I will show technology used at Hokkaido University, plus a drawing of a proposed system for training AV language

Goh Kawai is an associate professor of EFL and education engineering at Hokkaido University. He designs and evaluates learning environments for learning spoken language. He conducted research in California and Oregon, USA prior to coming to Sapporo. Goh has a PhD in information and communication engineering. http://goh.kawai.com/


対象:   CALL・インターネットを利用した英語教育に関心のある中高大の教員
             Presentations on CALL, Internet-based Language Learning, and Technology-enhanced Language Learning

日時:2011年10月15日(土) 午前10時00分開会

会場:札幌学院大学A館2階201号教室     All Foreign Language Teachers Welcome

The eleventh annual CALL Workshop at Sapporo Gakuin University will be held on Saturday, October 15th. This is a practical forum for all high school, junior high school and university foreign language teachers interested in how technology can support best practice in teaching and learning.  Over fifteen sessions will focus on training in software applications, demonstrations of successful classroom activities, presentations on new developments and research, and reports from active CALL developers in Hokkaido and beyond.  Topics typically include:

1.    internet projects  (for both beginner and experienced students)
2.    simple activities using PowerPoint and Word
3.    online language learning activities  (easy web design and hosting)  
4.    collaborative "community" software (discussion, chat, blogs, and surveys)
5.    editing sound files and building listening activities
6.    course management websites (gradebooks, collecting assignments & email)
7.    video-based language learning software
8.    content-based classes with internet  (popular music, intercultural communication)

The workshop will be held in the CALL laboratories at Sapporo Gakuin University in Ebetsu, just east of Sapporo.  The university is near the JR Oasa station, a 12 minute ride from downtown Sapporo.  Contact Seiichi Miyamachi <miyamach at sgu.ac.jp>, Tim Grose <grose at sgu.ac.jp> or Don Hinkelman <hinkel at sgu.ac.jp> for more information. There will be 500 yen fee to cover costs of materials and refreshments.  

Supported by: JALT Hokkaido, JALT CALL,  JACET Hokkaido Chapter CALL Study Group, METS, and Sapporo Gakuin University.  
Organized by: English Education Study Group at SGU  札幌学院大学英語教育研究会  
Contact: Tim Grose grose@earth.sgu.ac.jp, Seiichi Miyamachi miyamach@sgu.ac.jp or Don Hinkelman hinkel@sgu.ac.jp 

Abstracts for 2011 CALL Workshop

Session I:  Morning Workshops
   10:10 – 11:40

1.  Moodle Training Workshop (Beginners and Experienced Levels): Eric Hagley and Bob Gettings  (Room A-201)
Moodle is an interactive website useful for any language learning class.  It is an open source (free) learning management system that can be a one-stop location for giving online quizzes, handling email announcements to students, providing handouts for download, and publishing protected student blogs, chatrooms, forums, wikis, or glossaries.  This workshop will train teachers at three levels--for beginners, intermediate and advanced users of Moodle.  Teachers will make their own courses in a Moodle site and can use that site freely with their students after the workshop. 
-- Eric Hagley works at Muroran Institute of Technology. He has used computers to link his students with students in other countries in addition to a variety of CALL related applications.  Bob Gettings teaches at Hokusei Gakuen Junior College and manages e-learning for English classes using Moodle. Both Eric and Bob serve as trainers of the national Moodle Association of Japan conference (February 22-23, 2012).


2.  Moodlereader Training Workshop:  Don Hinkelman and Ken Friesen (Room C-201)
This workshop is a hands-on demonstration of the Moodlereader module which does online management of extensive reading programs. The program administers quizzes to assess whether students have read a book or not, and offers rewards and incentives for continual progress. Over 1500 graded readers are now in the Moodlereader system, with more added each month by teachers and publishers who contribute the content freely. In this workshop, we will give an overview of the system, and then have each participant experience reading a book and assessing themselves with Moodlereader quizzes. We will also report on student results from the previous semester of English majors and warn of potential pitfalls and mistakes in setting up the system. Teachers have a number of options to use Moodlereader after the workshop, including setting it up on the free moodlereader.org site or on your own local school server. Extensive reading aims for students to enjoy reading, and moodlereader aims for teachers to enjoy coaching a reading community. 
-- Don Hinkelman and Ken Friesen teach English oral communication at Sapporo Gakuin University. They have used the moodlereader module for extensive reading over the past year to build student enthusiasm and support speaking tasks in oral communication classes.


Session II:  Morning Presentations   11:40 – 12:10

3.   A Four-skills Activity Using the Moodle Database Module: David Campbell, Obihiro Univ. of Agric. and Vet. Medicine (Room A-201)
In this presentation I will share a simple four skills activity that can be set up in the Moodle database module that can "kill many birds with one stone." In many activities in the foreign language classroom there are logistical problems that need to be overcome. For example, in a class with a large number of students it can be difficult and time consuming to create pairs or groups. If you want people to have multiple partners, again there is the problem of moving students around and the delays involved in the process. If the activity is paper based then there is the problem of collecting and distributing the paper. If the instructor wants to get an idea of the students' output, there is the added burden of sorting through all those pieces of paper and the delay that it involves. By creating an activity using the Moodle database module in a blended learning environment the instructor can give the students the opportunity to practice speaking, listening, writing and reading quickly and easily while monitoring student output and providing timely feedback.
-- David has been teaching English in Japan for almost thirty years, but has only been teaching at the university level for the past three years. His research interest CALL is now mainly focused on using Moodle and trying to get the most out of the different modules to improve student learning.

4.   Student Reactions to the Moodle Reader: Martin Meadows, Nayoro City University  (Room C-201)

From April of this year, an extensive reading program for first-year students, delivered via the Moodle Reader, was begun at Nayoro University. This presentation will discuss students' reception to the program with reference to data provided by the moodle and results of a survey given to students at semester's end regarding their experiences with Moodle Reader. Additionally, the presenter will show how implementation of the program has effected library use by first-year students. Time permitting, a final open discussion will allow attendees to share their experiences with Moodle Reader.
-- Martin Meadows teaches at Nayoro City University in northern Hokkaido where he uses moodle to keep students and himself contacted with the outside world through the long and snowy winters.

Session III:  Keynote Presentation  1:00—2:05
5.   Listening Strategies in Self-Study, Computer-based Listening Modules:  (Room A-201)
      Goh Kawai, Hokkaido University, Center for Language Learning  [to abstract]

Session IV:   Afternoon Presentations  2:10—2:50

6.  Student Project: Creating Online Original Dubbed Cartoons: Geordie McGarty, Sapporo Gakuin University/Moon Tree School (A-201)
In a 2010 short presentation, Geordie shared a new web resource he had stumbled upon called "Kerpoof". In the year since he has explored its applications for ESL instruction.
He will be sharing several small activities culminating in a project through which students create original short animated movies including student dubbed soundtracks.
This can all be done with simple readily available online resources and limited classroom time or teacher involvement. The project met with considerable enthusiasm from students. This presentation includes a hands-on portion as well as viewing sample student work.
-- Geordie McGarty is a lecturer at Sapporo Gakuin University and owner/teacher at MoonTree English School. He has a background in elementary education including licensure in the United States. He is currently pursuing a MA in Applied Linguistics with Macquarie.


7.  Multi-cultural Skype-assisted Communications between America and Japan: Andy Johnson, Future University Hakodate  (C-301)
This project developed out of a desire to increase Japanese university students’ curiosity in foreign cultures and to encourage them to think more globally. The project initially involved forty students taking a mandatory communications class in Japan and twenty students from America - primarily Japanese majors. Two sessions of video Skype took place in the spring of 2011. In the first session, groups of 3 were formed with two students from Japan and one student from America with each group speaking for 15 minutes in the language of their choice. For the students in America, the primary goal was practicing Japanese skills. For the Japanese students, the primary goal was to speak to a peer from a foreign culture. The goal of the second session was for the students in Japan to learn firsthand from a Japanese national about the experience of traveling to a foreign culture. In this session, the Japanese teacher spoke in the students’ L 1 regarding various forms of cultural differences. This was followed by a Q&A period. This presentation depicts the challenges in organizing this multi-national communication, student perceptions to the experience and how communications between students continued after the initial Skype meeting.
 -- Andrew Johnson is an Associate Professor at Future University Hakodate. His research interests target technology enhanced second language education with emphasis on educational website creation, project based learning and technology enhanced student communications. He has been teaching at the tertiary level since 2002.


8.  Courteous Actions Speak Louder than Words:  Katherine Mansoor-Fuji, Hokkaido Information University  (C-201)
When students, teachers or businessmen visit other countries, they often strive to make a good verbal impression by studying vocabulary and phrases for common communication functions. However, often these good impressions are destroyed by their behavior:  a businessman cruising through a door before an older lady; bumping into people without apologies, not allowing people to exit an elevator before entering, or opening a door and letting it slam in the face of someone following. Good manners, like gestures, are often non-verbal and can create good impressions. Bad manners, on the other hand, can destroy cooperative working relationships.
-- Katherine Mansoor Fuji was born in the USA. She has lived in Germany, Iraq and Japan. She has travelled widely in Europe, Mexico and she is fascinated by languages, culture and communication.  She teaches at Hokkaido Information University and is associated with the Department of Global Medicine of Hokkaido University. One field of interest is aging and the social asset of the Silver Tsunami group.

Session V:  Afternoon Presentations  2:55—3:35

9.  Using Technology to Improve Oral Testing Techniques: Eric Hagley, Muroran Institute of Technology  (A-201)
When teaching a communication class, any achievement test that wishes to have construct and content validity should include communication tasks. As there is emphasis on oral communication in the syllabi of most communication classes, again, it should be imperative to include oral communication tasks in any test associated with said classes. Doing so will also ensure positive backwash from the htest is attained. In this presentation the major differences between oral communication language testing and other forms of language testing will be discussed and a method of oral testing proposed. This method incorporates the simple use of free recording software such as Audacity. When used with a Course Management System (CMS) such as Moodle it is very easy to handle grading too. The pitfalls and benefits associated with oral communication testing are also covered.
-- Eric Hagley works at Muroran Institute of Technology in Hokkaido, Japan. His first degree was in International Economics at Yokohama National University. He also has degrees in Education and linguistics. His master's thesis in Applied Linguistics at Macquarie University was on conversation analysis and the role recording of student interactions has on student motivation. He has classes at Muroran Institute of Technology that link his students with students in Colombia, Australia, the U.S., Thailand and Vietnam.


10. Integrating Video Assessment into an Oral Presentation Course: Joel Rian, Geordie McGarty, Don Hinkelman, Sapporo Gakuin University  (C-301)
In-class presentations are a common method of oral evaluation in communication-focused English classrooms at Japanese universities. Video recording of oral presentations offers a number of benefits, particularly the ability to repeatedly analyze a performance by both teachers and students. However, video recording is not often practical: online storage for and simple access to a large quantity of video files may be unavailable. Further, processing the files can be cumbersome and time consuming. This presentation catalogues the efforts to develop a speechmaking course for low- to mid-level EFL university students in a CALL environment using YouTube and elearning. The presenters will outline the 15-week syllabus, the goals of the course, and assessment methods. We will highlight how technical elements such as recording and uploading files have been improved over four years of trial and error, and how students have responded to the ability to self- and peer-assess by watching their own videos. The course is continuously being developed and revised, and there is potential to expand course materials authoring efforts to other universities. However, the techniques that we have employed for recording and assessing student performances may be useful for any classroom environment with larger student numbers and access to computers.
-- Joel Rian, Don Hinkelman and Geordie McGarty are English instructors at Sapporo Gakuin University. They co-teach the Oral Communication C classes for second year English majors, focusing on public speaking skills.

Session VI:  Afternoon Presentations  3:40—4:20

11.  Very Easily-made Pronunciation Videos for Computers or 'Smart' Devices: J. David  Hyre, Sapporo International Junior College  (A-201)
Japanese EFL students "keeping" Katakana pronunciation has always been an obstacle to learning and teaching. Students often keep their Japanese pronunciation of words that are borrowed from English and used in Japanese. For example, KFC signs  advertise "ドラムスティック" (Doramsiteikku) for chicken drumsticks and this is the pronunciation and number of syllables that students often internalize, along with pitch and stress which are mirror images of those used in native English. This not only affects their ability to be understood, but their ability to listen and understand English. I will cover how to use free software to quickly make pronunciation videos with symbols that move over the teacher's recorded voice as well as, how to get these videos into mp4-AVC, H264 (m2ts) or other formats  accessible to smart devices and html5 based browsers (if desired). I will also cover how to get them into .flv Flash, for those who prefer that format. Finally, I will explain how teachers can put their videos up on the web, particularly using Vimeo, a free video file streaming service, that is comparable to Youtube in ease-of-use and functionality.
-- Dave Hyre teaches at Sapporo International Junior College. He is interested in the use of video for student projects and pronunciation training in EFL classes.

12.   Useful Sites for Teaching Global Issues: Tim Grose, Sapporo Gakuin University  (C-201)
The complexity of the web means that sending students to do unmonitored research on the Internet is a recipe for disaster. This presentation will give some examples of effective sites measured in terms of the following criteria: the sites have a powerful visual impact; the language is accessible to language learners; the language is pedagogically appropriate insofar as it re-enforces language with which students are already familiar or provides a notional framework in which new language may be introduced. Finally, another measure of the effectiveness of the sites is whether or not students revisit them in their own time.
-- Tim Grose is an instructor at Sapporo Gakuin University. He is particularly interested in content-based curricula design especially relating to environmental issues.























* 2006 Schedule2006 Summaries * 2007 Schedule2007 Abstracts * 2008 Schedule2008 Abstracts *
2008 Presentations:

"Listening Strategies in Self-Study, Computer-based Listening Modules"
A National Curriculum for EFL Listening Skill Development

Wichian Sunithan (Chiang Mai University, Thailand)

"Video Production for Language Teaching"
and  "Using iPods in the Classroom"

Nicolas Gromik (Tohoku University, Japan)


2008 Presentation Schedule >>      2008 Download Abstracts PDF (6.6mb) >>


Keynote Presentation:  A-kan, Room A-201, 1:00pm, Sapporo Gakuin University
Listening Strategies in Self-Study, Computer-based Listening Modules
Wichian Sunitham, Assistant Professor, Chiang Mai University, Thailand
Award Winner: TESOL International Research Foundation

Keywords: computer-based lessons, language learning strategies, listening strategies, second language learning, EFL/ESL methods

This presentation will be about 15 listening self-study lessons developed during October 2005-July 2007. These self-study lessons are part of the computer-based English language project, funded by the Commission on Higher Education, Ministry of Education, Thailand and aimed to be used as supplementary or complementary lessons for foundation EFL classes in all universities in Thailand. In this presentation, the presenter will inform the audience the following issues:


1.    Background information of the project
2.    How listening strategies were incorporated in these listening lessons
3.    How listening strategies may be fostered by these self-study lessons to create awareness among ESL/EFL learners, and facilitate their listening comprehension
       (Vandergrift, 1999; Berman, 2003; Cardenas-Claros and Gruba, 2007)


In this presentation session, the presenter would also like to demonstrate and share his hands-on experience working on the project for those who wish to create similar lessons. Sample CDs of the courseware will be distributed to interested participants who wish to do future joint research studies based on (1) the implementation of the lessons, (2) the development of computer-based projects, and (3) how computer-based lessons can explicitly or implicitly provide listening strategies for learners to enhance their performance on listening tasks.  email: wichian.sunitham at gmail.com

Wichian Sunitham is an assistant professor of English and Linguistic Sciences at Faculty of Humanities, Chiang Mai University. His Master's Degree in Linguistics is from Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok. Currently, he teaches Syntax, Semantics, and Psycholinguistics for third-year and fourth-year English major students. Wichian has co-researched with both national and international scholars and has presented his academic works in a number of conferences both in Thailand and abroad. His research areas include applied and cognitive linguistics, language acquisition, as well as application of technology in language teaching. Wichian Sunitham was awarded the Priority Research Grant from TESOL International Research Foundation. His nationally recognized web-based projects include a listening web-based project for the Commission on Higher Education, Ministry of Education, Thailand, and a web-based integrated English course for Ministry of Science and Technology.


Keynote Workshop:  A-kan, Room A-201, 10:15am, Sapporo Gakuin University
Video Production for Language Teaching
Nicholas Gromik, Senior Lecturer, Tohoku University
Nicholas Gromik

A review of the literature will reveal that educators use video technology to assist them in collecting evidence and observations of students’ performance or to share with colleagues best teaching practices (Gromik, 2007). Therefore the aim of this workshop is to train language teachers to become aware of the benefits that video production can provide them and their learners. This is a 90 minutes hands-on workshop about video editing from preparation to publishing on the web. During this two part workshop participants work in teams to experience how to structure and film a basic movie. Filming issues such as lighting, framing, sound quality, and storyboard design are addressed in the first part of the workshop. In the second part participants experience how to edit their movie by uploading the film to the video editing software included with Movie Maker (Windows XP) or Macintosh's iMovie. During the editing phase participants experiment with editing audio, photos, and film, and add audio narration. They will also save their final video production.
                                                                       
Nicolas Gromik is a senior lecturer at Tohoku University. He regularly provides teacher training workshops on movie making and editing internationally as well as participating in online teacher training. He also serves as an officer of the JALT CALL SIG, one of the largest associations for language teaching and technology in Japan.  Email: gromik_tohoku at yahoo.com.au

CALL Workshop 2008 Schedule

 Revised October 6, 2008

Registration from 9:30am (refreshments available)

Opening Presentation   9:50 – 10:10
1.  Blended Language Learning Rooms: Don Hinkelman, Sapporo Gakuin University, Laura MacGregor, Gakushuin University
     (public opening of five new "blended" rooms and CALL room at SGU)


Session I:  Morning Workshops and Presentations   10:15 – 12:15
2.   Video Production for Language Teaching, Nicholas Gromik, Tohoku University
3.   Moodle Training Workshop--3 Levels:  Bob Gettings, Eric Hagley, Peter Ruthven-Stuart    Take the pre-workshop survey >>

4.   Developing English Learner Independence in Japanese HS Writers  Michael A. Hayes, Kiyota High School     10:15-10:50
5.   Interactive QR Code Activities in the EFL Classroom:  Damian Rivers
& Craig Langdon, Kanda University of International Studies  10:55-11:30
6.   Podcast Production as Pronunciation Practice  Dirk MacKenzie, Kanda University of International Studies

 
Session II:  Keynote Presentation  1:00—1:45

7.   Listening Strategies in Self-Study, Computer-based Listening Modules
      Wichian Sunitham, Chiang Mai University

Session IV:   Afternoon Presentations  1:50—2:35
 8. Using iPods in the Classroom:  Nicolas Gromik, Tohoku University
 
9.  Unleash the Power of WordPress in Your Classroom or Organization: Bob Palmer, Hokkai Gakuen University; Glen Hill, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine 
10. Interactive, Student-Taught Grammar Lessons:  Jennifer Holland, Kanda University of International Studies


Session V:  Afternoon Presentations  2:40—3:25
11.  Surveys and Video Cellphones: An English Language Experience:  Jerald Halvorsen, Norihito Kawana,Sapporo International University
12.  Web 2.0 Tools: Three of the Best for Teaching EFL/ESL Bob Palmer, Hokkai Gakuen University
13.  Fostering Learners’ Self-Access Learning by Providing Learning Pathways: Azusa Kodate, Kanda University of International Studies
14.  Create a Fictional Country:  Kenlay Freisen, Sapporo Gakuin University

Session VI:  Short Presentations/Case Reports  3:30—4:15
15.  The Effects of Anxiety and Motivation on Computer Use and Public Speaking Tomoko Nakamura, Sapporo Keihoku Commercial High School
16.  Wikis and Chat Used in Writing Classes to Encourage Collaborative Writing:  Eric Hagley, Muroran Institute of Technology
17.  Facebook & Social Networking in the EFL Classroom, Geordie McGarty, Sapporo Gakuin University

Session VII:  Short Presentations/Case Reports  4:20—5:00
18. Actions and Words: Pedagogical Challenges in a Study Abroad Program in Laos:  William Kay, Hokkai Gakuen; Tim Grose, Sapporo Gakuin University
19. Moodle in the Composition Classroom:  Kenlay Freisen, Sapporo Gakuin University; Bob Gettings, Hokusei Gakuen Junior College
20. The New Question-Creation Module for Moodle,  Peter Ruthven-Stuart, Hakodate Future University

Closing Speech: 4:55 - 5:00       Seiichi Miyamachi, Sapporo Gakuin University

Networking Party:  5:15  (Tsubohachi, Bunkyodai--approx. 3000-4000 yen)  



CALL Workshop 2008 Abstracts

 Updated October 6, 2008    Download Abstracts PDF (6.6mb) >>
 
 Opening Speech: 9:50 - 10:10

1.  Blended Language Learning Rooms
     Don Hinkelman, Sapporo Gakuin University; Laura MacGregor, Gakushuin University
In April 2008, Sapporo Gakuin University opened five blended language learning rooms and one renovated CALL room.  This conference marks the first public opening and demonstration of these rooms.  In this presentation, I will introduce the purpose, design, and operation of these rooms within a task-based/project-based language learning curriculum. Many of the ideas were built upon the concept of “blended learning rooms” at Kanda University of International Studies, set up over five years ago.  In this conference we are pleased to welcome five other presenters who teach in the KUIS programs.  In addition, special guest speaker, Laura MacGregor, will open the program with her comments on the importance of blended learning and how her vision for Gakushuin and other universities in the future.
   Don Hinkelman teaches at Sapporo Gakuin University and uses online Moodle activities with his face-to-face classes to provide a “blended” approach to all projects and topics.  Don serves as a moderator for the Moodle for Language Teaching community and the Hokkaido-area Englishforum support group for Moodle. His doctoral research project is called, “Blended environments in second language learning”.
Email: hinkel at sgu.ac.jp    Free Moodle Support Site:  http://englishforum.sgu.ac.jp/moodle/
   Laura MacGregor is a professor at Gakushuin University, Tokyo.  She started her work here in Japan as an ALT in Hokkaido, taught at Sapporo Gakuin University, Sapporo International University and other schools for several years.  After serving as JALT Hokkaido president, she did research on the Eiken testing practice and other timely issues in English language education.  Moving to Tokyo, she worked at Sophia University and now Gakushuin University as a professor teaching English and communication subjects.


Session I:  Morning Workshops and Presentations  10:15 – 12:15

2. Video production for language teaching 
    Nicolas Gromik Tohoku University
A review of the literature will reveal that educators use video technology to assist them in collecting evidence and observations of students’ performance or to share with colleagues best teaching practices (Gromik, 2007). Therefore the aim of this workshop is to train language teachers to become aware of the benefits that video production can provide them and their learners. This is a 90 minutes hands-on workshop about video editing from preparation to publishing on the web. During this two part workshop participants work in teams to experience how to structure and film a basic movie. Filming issues such as lighting, framing, sound quality, and storyboard design are addressed in the first part of the workshop. In the second part participants experience how to edit their movie by uploading the film to the video editing software included with Movie Maker (Windows XP) or Macintosh's iMovie. During the editing phase participants experiment with editing audio, photos, and film, and add audio narration. They will also save their final video production.
   Nicolas Gromik is a senior lecturer at Tohoku University. He regularly provides teacher training workshops on movie making and editing internationally as well as participating in online teacher training.
email: gromik_tohoku at yahoo.com.au
 
3. Moodle Training Workshop--Three Levels    Take the pre-workshop survey >>
    Bob Gettings, Eric Hagley, Peter Ruthven-Stuart
Moodle is an interactive website useful for any language learning class.  It is an open source (free) learning management system that can be a one-stop location for giving online quizzes, handling email announcements to students, providing handouts for download, and publishing protected student blogs, chatrooms, forums, wikis, or glossaries.  This workshop will train teachers at three levels--for beginners, intermediate and advanced users of Moodle.  Teachers will make their own courses in a Moodle site and can use that site freely with their students after the workshop.    
    Level 1—Absolute Beginner Moodle Teachers     Bob Gettings
For teachers who have never tried Moodle and would like a basic introduction to its features, this will be a helpful session to determine if Moodle would be helpful for your classes.  Even teachers who have never used computers for language teaching may find it useful to see how discussion forums, blogs, chatrooms, surveys, online quizzes and other interactive activities can make livelier learning programs and streamline management of assignments, grades, and materials.
    Level 2—Somewhat Experienced Moodle Teachers     Eric Hagley
For teachers who have tried Moodle and know a little about the activities and modules, this is a good workshop to expand the types of activities you are using.  For example, Hot Potatoes is popular software used to create a number of unique types of quizzes that language learners enjoy—such as drag-and-drop or matching exercises.  We will teach you how to get hot potatoes up and running, how to create quizzes, and how to upload them to the net. Please request the kind of activity you would like to do and we will lead you step-by-step in the process.
    Level 3—Experienced Moodle Teachers     Peter Ruthven-Stuart
For teachers who are skilled with Moodle and want to expand their content and try optional (non-standard) modules & blocks, this session will be ideal. In this workshop, participants will be shown how to begin populating their course with content, and how to design their students' online experience for optimum results. The main points that will be covered are:
-  Course formats & settings
-  Uploading videos clips
-  Grading & Scales
-  Quizzes and Exams
-  Constructing pedagogically sound 'Learning Units'
-  Sharing Moodle course material
 - Optional Modules (Feedback, Project, Exercise, PHPMyAdmin & other mods and blocks)
   Bob Gettings teaches at Hokusei Gakuen Junior College.   He has trained teachers on Moodle for over five years at workshops in Hokkaido.  He loves integrating video into his Moodle courses.
   Eric Hagley now works at Muroran Institute of Technology where he has set up Moodle as the school-wide learning management system.  He has also used computers to link his students with students in other countries in addition to a variety of CALL related applications.
   Peter Ruthven-Stuart teaches at Future University–Hakodate, and has been using CALL since 1997. He has been using Moodle since 2003 and now runs two Moodle servers in his university, He is especially interested in the design process of content creation and how the design of online activities can foster autonomous learning.

4. Developing English Learner Independence in Japanese HS Writers 
    Michael A. Hayes, Kiyota High School, Sapporo, Hokkaido
Does a carefully controlled classroom environment lead to students being more dependent or less dependent on teachers? Can process writing be a controlled activity? Teacher beliefs can diverge from student-centered solutions. This presentation will demonstrate a unique scaffolding approach to research and process writing that sees students needing little translation or re-writing by the teacher. Participants will learn about the experience of students and teachers in the new Global Course of Studies at Kiyota HS. Anecdotes of successes and failures will be shared. The materials and objectives of this approach to controlled process writing will be shown as well as key video clips, showing students using the very process in a CALL room setting. Participants will be asked to briefly discuss their own practices and views on the speaker's method in small groups. The process itself works from paper toward the computer. Many small pre-writing steps such as brainstorming and note-taking build micro skills that enable fluency as witnessed in the video clips. Participants will leave the session with materials and memorable images. Before leaving, everyone will be asked to simply evaluate the method.
     Growing up in Canada in an Anglophone home, Michael went to native Francophone schools and received a BA(Hon.) in French and BED from Dalhousie University.  He also received an Inservice TESOL Diploma (VCC) while teaching ESL for 8 years in Vancouver. In Sapporo, he has taught at Kiyota HS for 3 years.
email: mikehayes1 at hotmail.com
 
5. Interactive QR Code Activities in the EFL Classroom
    Damian Rivers, Kanda University of International Studies, International Communication Dept, Chiba
    Craig Langdon, Kanda University of International Studies, English Dept, Chiba
Our presentation will describe the process and present the findings of a pilot project which attempted to further promote self-access and social interaction through the use of mobile phones.  QR codes on a paper handout were used to input information into students’ mobile phones and then prompt a series of English learning activities. The project involved freshman students at Kanda University of International Studies and was created with the aim of being used as part of the core curriculum in 2009.  We shall focus on two specific examples of QR code driven task-based learning activities. The first project was implemented within a freshmen writing class and the second project was implemented within a basic English class. The two projects differed in their delivery with one being an individually focused effort whilst the other required students to collaborate with other group members. All students were then given a survey which assessed attitudes toward QR code and mobile phone usage as experienced in each of the projects. We shall discuss the advantages and disadvantages surrounding the implementation of such QR code projects and
activities.
    Damian Rivers has been teaching in Japan for nine years. He has worked at corporations such as Honda, Panasonic, Toshiba and is currently a Lecturer in the International Communication department at Kanda University of International Studies. His interests are in World Englishes, internationalization within Japan, language ideologies within Asia and task-based language teaching. email: (http://www.eapstudy.com)
   Craig Langdon has been teaching EFL for the past seven years and has taught in the UK, South Korea and his native New Zealand. He is currently a Lecturer at Kanda University for International Studies in Chiba, Japan. His research interests include new media technology applications to pedagogical methodology and autonomous learning.
 
6.  Podcast Production as Pronunciation Practice 
    Dirk MacKenzie, Kanda University of International Studies, Chiba
If—according to Schmidt’s “noticing hypothesis”—“what learners notice in input” is indeed “what becomes intake for learning”, teachers need to develop activities that promote noticing of language features in the classroom. This presentation will outline a project designed to promote student noticing of pronunciation and intonation features. After studying pronunciation and intonation with audio podcasts, students produced their own podcasts on Japanese cultural topics. Working collaboratively in groups, students researched, wrote and edited their own scripts. Then with scripts in hand, they sought help with pronunciation and intonation from native English speakers: As the native speakers read theirscripts aloud, students listened for pronunciation of difficult words, and marked down stressed and unstressed syllables. They then practiced reading the scripts themselves with native English pronunciation and intonation. Finally, students recorded their podcasts using MiniDisc (MD) recorders, adding music and sound effects to round out their productions. The finished products are to be uploaded to the iTunes store. Sample podcasts will be played, and timing, technical issues and grading will be discussed. The presenter will also discuss ways that the output phase of the project enhanced student noticing with reference to Swain’s “output hypothesis”.
    Dirk MacKenzie holds an MA in Applied Language Studies from Carleton University. He has taught ESL at the Collège de Jonquière and Algonquin College in Canada. He is currently a lecturer at Kanda University of International Studies in Japan. His research interests include CALL, learner autonomy and noticing. email:dirk.mackenzie at yahoo.com

   [Back to Top]
 Session II:  Keynote Presentation  1:00- 1:45

 7. Listening Strategies in Self-Study, Computer-based Listening Modules
      A National Curriculum for EFL Listening Skill Development
      Wichian Suthinam, Chiang Mai University, Thailand

KEYWORDS: computer-based lessons, language learning strategies, listening strategies, second language learning, EFL/ESL methods

This presentation will be about 15 listening self-study lessons developed during October 2005-July 2007. These self-study lessons are part of the computer-based English language project, funded by the Commission on Higher Education, Ministry of Education, Thailand and aimed to be used as supplementary or complementary lessons for foundation EFL classes in all universities in Thailand. In this presentation, the presenter will inform the audience the following issues:
1.    Background information of the project
2.    How listening strategies were incorporated in these listening lessons
3.    How listening strategies may be fostered by these self-study lessons to create awareness among ESL/EFL learners, and facilitate their listening comprehension
       (Vandergrift, 1999; Berman, 2003; Cardenas-Claros and Gruba, 2007)
In this presentation session, the presenter would also like to demonstrate and share his hands-on experience working on the project for those who wish to create similar lessons. Sample CDs of the courseware will be distributed to interested participants who wish to do future joint research studies based on (1) the implementation of the lessons, (2) the development of computer-based projects, and (3) how computer-based lessons can explicitly or implicitly provide listening strategies for learners to enhance their performance on listening tasks.
    Wichian Sunitham is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English, Chiang Mai University, Thailand.  In 2004, he was awarded a research grant by the TESOL International Research Foundation and developed numerous projects in CALL and EFL listening skill training.  Email:  wichian.sunitham at gmail.com


Session III: Afternoon Presentations  1:50–2:35

8. Using iPods in the Classroom 

    Nicolas Gromik, Tohoku University
In this 45-minute demonstration, participants will experience how to integrate iPods in their curriculum to promote students' independent studies. The first part of the presentation reports on English as a Foreign Language students' use of iPod technology to develop target language awareness. This section explains how to design a survey in collaboration with students. It also demonstrates how to explain to students the reasons for integrating iPod technology in the language classroom for independent studies. In the second part, participants utilize iPods to experience the learning benefits as well as the process behind independent studies. The presentation finishes with a discussion about the educational merits of integrating iPod-based independent studies in the EFL curriculum.
   Nicolas Gromik is a senior lecturer at Tohoku University. He regularly provides teacher training workshops on movie making and editing internationally as well as participating in online teacher training.
email: gromik_tohoku at yahoo.com.au

9. Unleash the Power of WordPress in Your Classroom or Organization
      Bob Palmer, Hokkai Gakuen University; Glen Hill, Obihiro University of Agriculture & Veterinary Medicine
WordPress is an incredibly versatile open-source publishing platform that can be used to make a simple blog or build a powerful content management system. Created in 2003, it now boasts being the world’s “largest self-hosting blogging tool.” The presenters have used WordPress to make publishing platforms for students, teachers, and the JALT Hokkaido chapter, and our presentation will illustrate these uses with an introduction to fully operational blogs, including the JALT Hokkaido site. The workshop will then go into detail on the technical setup (hosting options, templates, plugins, widgets) and practical perspectives based on our own experiences. In addition to learning how to set up WordPress and many of its related features, participants will be given firsthand tips on how to handle various issues such as adding comments, blocking spam, inserting pictures and video, tracking user hits, and lots more!
    Bob Palmer is a CALL/EFL lecturer at Hokkai Gakuen University and Sapporo University. A graduate of the TESOL Online Teaching Program, he has created a number of websites and training resources in support of English language teaching and learning, including the JALT Hokkaido website. email: bpalmer at gol.com
    Glen Hill has taught English in Hokkaido for 10 years, with experience in university, high school, eikaiwa, and private teaching. His research interests are reading skills, listening skills, CALL technology, and ESP for science majors. He also serves as editor and chief contributor to the JALT Hokkaido blog.  email: hill at obihiro.ac.jp 
 
10. Interactive, Student Taught Grammar Lessons 
   Jennifer Holland, Kanda University of International Studies
Approaches to grammar instruction have traditionally been teacher-centered. Particularly in Asian contexts, teachers are often regarded as the authority on English grammar and instruction typically takes the form of textbook exercises and explanations. At Kanda University of International Studies (KUIS) in Chiba, Japan, core subjects for students majoring in English are taught by native speakers from around the world. In the first-year curriculum, students are introduced to the concepts of individualization, interaction and interdependence. These concepts encourage learner participation and the development of autonomy, which are further developed over the 4-year course of study. This paper discusses the methodology and outcomes of student-directed grammar activities implemented in a second-year grammar course at KUIS. These activities aimed to engage students in interactive learning activities to empower them to take responsibility for their own learning. To achieve these objectives, students worked in small groups to create a handout and develop an interactive class activity in order to “teach” a chosen grammar point to their classmates. Student feedback indicated that the course content became more stimulating and useful through the student projects. In the future, such student-directed methods could provide an alternative to traditional grammar teaching methods in Japan and beyond.
    Jennifer Holland is a Lecturer in the English Language Institute at Kanda University of International Studies in Chiba, Japan. She received her MA in TESOL in 2005 from Saint Michael’s College in Vermont, USA. Her research interests include self-editing in writing and student-directed grammar instruction.
email: jholland at kanda.kuis.ac.jp
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Session IV:  Afternoon Presentations  2:40—3:25

11. Surveys and Video Cellphones: An English Language Experience

     Jerald Halvorsen and Norihito Kawana, Sapporo International University
This presentation focuses on a three-day English immersion program during which a group of 13 students conducted interviews with 230 foreign visitors to a popular ski resort. Students collected data and also used cell phones to record videos, take photographs and conduct video conferencing with a teacher/coordinator. Both the survey data and the videos and photographs were archived and were shared with the local tourist association. They are now being used in the classroom to generate further conversation and student research. The research was intended to determine what the overseas visitors needed in order to improve their vacation experience. A training session was held at the university the day before the project started. Students practiced using the telephones and also practiced the research questions and possible answers. Students were excited that they could communicate with native speakers of English as well as visitors who used English as the common language. After the interviews were concluded the students also were asked their impressions of the research. The presenters will share student responses to the project and also share some of the survey results of what foreigners feel is needed in the resort area.
   Jerald Halvorsen, Sapporo International University, is interested in intensive English camps and using authentic materials in teaching. email: jollygvlc at yahoo.com.  Norihito Kawana, Sapporo International Univesity, is interested in CALL research and using blogs for English study.  email: kawana at ed.siu.ac.jp

12. Web 2.0 Tools: Three of the Best for Teaching EFL/ESL
    Bob Palmer, Hokkai Gakuen University and Sapporo University
According to Wikipedia, Web 2.0 is “a trend in World Wide Web technology and web design, a second generation of web-based communities and hosted services such as social networking sites, wikis, and blogs, which aim to facilitate creativity, collaboration, and sharing among users.” Now there’s a mouthful! A simpler characterization might be to think of Web 2.0 as the “Read/Write Web” as opposed to the “Read Only” Web. The number of Web 2.0 applications is growing everyday and competing for your attention as a teacher. How to decide which have real pedagogical value? And which ones actually motivate students to willingly engage in language practice? In this workshop, we will address these questions as we explore three excellent such tools the presenter has used successfully to capture students’ imaginations and reinforce their language learning.
     Bob Palmer is a CALL/EFL lecturer at Hokkai Gakuen University and Sapporo University. A graduate of the TESOL Online Teaching Program, he has created a number of websites and online training resources in support of English language teaching and learning, including the JALT Hokkaido website.  email: bpalmer at gol.com
 
13. Fostering Learners’ Self-Access Learning by Providing Learning Pathways
    Azusa Kodate, Kanda University of International Studies, Chiba
Today, with increasing interests in field of learner autonomy, values of extra-curriculum learning, such as learning at a self- access centre, are becoming widely recognised. Given the highlight on the area as well as independent and life-long learning, which are under the same umbrella as autonomous learning, empowering and encouraging learners to take controls and responsibilities over their own learning is one of the most significant parts of our roles as Learning Advisors in the SALC. In other words, learners ultimately need to know how to learn by themselves in both short and long-term perspectives. When learners know how to access and utilise suitable and appropriate resources together with relevant learning strategies, they are ready to learn effectively by themselves having greater control and responsibility over their learning. The key point, therefore, is to equip the learners with relevant materials selection skills and learning strategies by introducing possible learning pathways so that the learners can apply the paths to a range of learning contexts. In this presentation, I am going to introduce the principle and process of developing and designing these materials with which learners can learn how to help themselves with their learning.
    Azusa Kodate completed her MA in English Language Studies and Methods at the University of Warwick, and is currently working at the Self-Access Learning Centre of KUIS as a Learning Advisor. She runs Independent Learning Modules in the Centre to enhance learner autonomy amongst the students. email: azusaxiaoguan  at gmail.com
 
14.  Create a Fictional Country
       Kenlay Friesen, Sapporo Gakuin University
Creating a fictional country is an effective and enjoyable activity in which students can express their creativity ingenuity, and humor.   This unit incorporates the Internet, Moodle, and a variety of on-line web-sites, as well as communicative activities, listening exercises, and learning strategies.   They practice the same language functions, grammar points and communication strategies, that they would if they were talking about their hometown, but are free to use their imaginations and creativity.   The students work in pairs to develop an original country from scratch, including selecting a name, choosing its location, and describing famous sightseeing places, recreational activities, and even restaurants and shops.  The unit ends with an attempt by the students to persuade each other, through both a presentation and one-on-one conversations, to come and visit their fictional country. 
     Kenlay Friesen teaches English communication at Sapporo Gakuin University.  His current classes include low level, low motivation students who need challenging and creative activities to catch their interest.  email:  kenlayfriesen at yahoo.ca

Session V:  Afternoon presentations II  3:30—4:15
 
15. The Effects of Anxiety and Motivation on Computer Use and Public Speaking
    Tomoko Nakamura, Sapporo Keihoku Commercial High School
Recently quite a few teachers have introduced the use of computers and public speaking activities in their classrooms. We, however, face questions such as: do computer use and public speaking make any difference to JHS EFL students’ anxiety and motivation? Are there any implications of their English ability? Do foreign language anxiety and motivation differ according to the participants’ English ability? The presenter shows a study that investigated the effects of computer use and public speech on anxiety and motivation of Japanese junior high school students. 220 students answered the survey consisting of items to measure their foreign language (FL) anxiety and three constructs of motivation (interest in FL, instrumental motivation, need for achievement) before and after the treatment: writing drafts using computers and making presentation about their favorite celebrities in English. In the post survey, they also answered questions to ask which factor: computer use or public speech increased/decreased their anxiety/motivation and if they want to try it again. Out of 220, 10 boys and 10 girls with grade 5 (the highest) and 10 boys and 10 girls with grade 3 (the middle) were chosen and analyzed.
    Tomoko Nakamura teaches at Keihoku Commercial High School. She has experience teaching at Hokkaido International School as well as a Junior High School in Sapporo. She launched a new course of English in 2005 and has been supervising it. She has an MA in Education and a TESOL certificate. email: tomoconakamura at hotmail.co.jp

16. Wikis and Chat Used in Writing Classes to Encourage Collaborative Writing
      Eric Hagley, Muroran Institute of Technology
Technology has developed to the point where students can now write a piece of work not only by themselves but in collaboration with others. This presentation will show how students have developed their writing prowess in cooperation with their peers via wikis and chat. The presentation will offer hands on experience of how to do this using the Moodle system.
     Eric worked previously at Otaru Junior College. He developed language interaction between his students and those in the US and Colombia. His research involved discourse analysis and CALL. Those endeavors and ESP, particularly engineering, are now done at Muroran Institute of Technology. His students now interact with students in Thailand, Vietnam and China too. email: hagley at mmm.muroran-it.ac.jp

17. Facebook & Social Networking in the EFL Classroom
       Geordie McGarty, Sapporo Gakuin University
Geordie McGarty will share his experience in integrating "Facebook" into a unit on introductions. Facebook is one of the most popular social networking sites on the net. It is particularly popular in English speaking countries and among university age students. He will share materials used to introduce the concept to students as well as indispensable online resources. Particular attention will be paid to the variety of applications that allow students to interact with one another and the world at large. As this unit is still in development he would appreciate any input the audience might like to share as well.
    Geordie teaches English communication at Sapporo Gakuin University and is the founder and head teacher at Moontree English School. He is a licensed Elementary School teacher in the United States and specializes in teaching English to children.  He also develops web 2.0 applications for EFL in Japan.  Email: geordiemcgarty at gmail.com

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Session V:  Afternoon presentations II  3:20—4:50

18.  Actions and Words: Pedagogical Challenges in a Study Abroad Program in Laos
    William Kay, Hokkai Gakuen University, Tim Grose, Sapporo Gakuin University.
The presenters accompanied eight university students on a 12-day study program to Laos. The students participated in a wide range of activities such as visits to schools, an exchange program with Laotian college students, a lecture by the UN, an environmental field trip and visits to local fair-trade enterprises. The purpose of the program was twofold: to broaden student perceptions concerning some of the challenges facing one of our Asian neighbours and to expose them to functional English as the lingua franca of international communication. The presenters felt that the language aspects could be improved for future programs and will outline a number of CALL related proposals for pre-departure language studies. Future improvements include class-to-class and individual e-mail exchanges with Laotian students, a research and presentation program to understand Laotian culture, its environmental, cultural and social challenges, and vocabulary building exercises. Feedback from the program’s student participants will also be featured.
    William Kay is an English instructor currently teaching at Hokkai Gakuen University in Hokkaido. He is currently active in the Teachers Helping Teachers SIG which is dedicated to the aid and assistance of fellow educators and students in the developing nations of the Asia Pacific region. email: sapporowill at hotmail.com.  Tim Grose is Assistant Professor of English at Sapporo Gakuin University where he has been teaching for a number of years. He is an active member of the Global Issues in Language Education JALTSIG and is particularly interested in designing pedagogically appropriate material for such learners.  email:  grose at sgu.ac.jp

19.  Moodle in the Composition Classroom
       Kenlay Friesen, Sapporo Gakuin University; Bob Gettings, Hokusei Junior College
In this workshop, we will explore a variety of ways to use Moodle in the composition classroom.  The main topics to be covered will be how to set up the Moodle site for a writing class, managing process writing with feedback and revisions, and creating interactive student journals.  Lastly, we will discuss the benefits of administering a writing class in this way.  Teacher input regarding past experiences of using Moodle to teach writing, as well as opinions regarding the efficacy of this approach, are encouraged.
     Kenlay Friesen teaches English communication at Sapporo Gakuin University.  His current classes include low level, low motivation students who need challenging and creative activities to catch their interest.  email:  kenlayfriesen at yahoo.ca.   Bob Gettings teaches at Hokusei Gakuen Junior College.   He has taught EFL writing for over twenty years and trained teachers on Moodle for over five years at workshops in Hokkaido. 

20. The New Question Creation Activity Module for Moodle
      Peter Ruthven-Stuart, Hakodate Future University
This presentation will describe the development and use of the "Question Creation Activity": a new module that can be freely installed into a Moodle system. This activity is intended to encourage students both to take more responsibility for their learning, and to collaborate together with their peers on the creation of learning material. With this activity, a teacher can get students to create questions about any "body of information". The creation of questions includes the writing of answers, distracters and feedback. Once completed, the questions can be graded automatically or assessed by a teacher, and subsequently imported into Moodle quizzes. The presenter will explain the philosophy behind the module, demonstrate how the module works, and also describe how it has been used in some university classes. Participants will be able to try the activity themselves. This presentation will be of interest to teachers wanting to get their own students more involved with the learning process, as well as to non-programmers interested in designing CALL software. Information about the module can be found here: http://qca.petesweb.org/

Closing Speech 4:55- 5:00
     Seiichi Miyamachi, Sapporo Gakuin University
       
Networking Party:  5:15  (Tsubohachi, Bunkyodai--approx. 3000-4000 yen)  

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Previous CALL Workshop -- 2007 Schedule

Revised October 16, 2007

Welcome:  10:00—10:10
     (refreshments and doors open at 9:30 am)

Session I:  Morning Workshops   10:10 – 12:15
1.   Moodle Training Workshop--Three Levels, Peter Ruthven-Stuart, Eric Hagley, Don Hinkelman
2.   Video Editing: 'Mix and Mash', Bob Gettings

3.   Transforming a Course in English Phonetics with Moodle, Suzanne Yonesaka   10:10-11:00
4.    Making Listening Activities for Moodle with Audacity, Ian Munby  11:05--12:00

Session II:  Keynote Presentation  1:00—2:10
5.   「北海道大 学における大規模英語オンライン学習 」、 河合 剛 (北海道大学 外国語教育センター)
  Large-scale Online English Language Learning at Hokkaido University
  Goh Kawai: Hokkaido University, Center for Language Learning


Session III:   Afternoon Presentations  2:15—3:00
6.   「音 声ソフトの可能性:eラー ニングコンテンツ作成における音声ソフトの利用価値」 川名 典人  札幌国際大学
7.     Using Social Network Sites for CALL Activities, B. Bricklin Zeff
8.      Student-generated Video in the EFL Classroom--TV Commercials, Joseph Booth
9.     Moodle's New Project Module, Andy Johnson

Session IV:  Afternoon Presentations  3:05—3:50
10. One Year-Four Phase Plan for Improving Skills through Presentations」 三角 美樹    札幌啓北商業高等学校
11.    Web 2.0: From Consumers to Creators, Peter Ruthven-Stuart
12.    Using Online Forums to Augment Discussions, Rob McGuire [cancelled]
13.     Monitoring Student Responses to a Blended Learning Approach, Will Kay

Session V:  Short Presentations/Case Reports  3:55—4:25
14. 学習管理システ ム(LMS)を使用しない複合型授業 川名  さなえ  札幌学院大学
15.   Textbooks? No! Blended CALL for EFL Conversation Classes, Bob Gettings
16.   Using Questionnaires in Moodle to Conduct Class Surveys, Martin Meadows

Session VI:  Short Presentations/Case Reports  4:30—5:00

17.    Using the Glossary Module in Moodle, Phil Radcliffe
18.    How to Access or Set up a Moodle Site, Peter Ruthven-Stuart
19.   
Teaching Issues in a Blended Classroom, Tim Grose

Closing:  5:00         Networking Party:  5:15  (Tsubohachi, Bunkyodai--approx. 3000-4000 yen)  

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CALL Workshop 2007
Keynote Presentation: 
「北海道大学 における大規模英語オンライン学習」
                         ”Large-scale online English language learning at Hokkaido University”


河 合 剛 (北海道大学 外国語教育センター) 
Goh Kawai (Hokkaido University, Center for Language Learning)

Seeking to reduce personnel costs, Hokkaido University implemented a one-semester, wholly online English language course for the entire freshmen class (2641 students for the 2007 academic year).
    The hoped-for financial savings are not being realized for two reasons:
(a) CALL system costs (hardware and software acquisition and maintenance, courseware development, and staff training) are substantial and recurring, and (b) full-time instructors and teaching assistants need to personally assist students transitioning from passive, entrance-exam-oriented learning to proactive, independent, academic learning.
    We are achieving results, however, in three directions: (a) developing courseware and enabling technologies, (b) reducing class sizes of instructor-led courses, and (c) improving learning outcomes.
    Our learning experiences, which were initially designed ad hoc, are gradually coalescing into a meaningful and manageable whole. We seek to balance receptive and productive skills -- the latter a technical challenge in an online course with minimal feedback from instructors.  Students appreciate pronunciation tasks, partly because many have never been formally trained, and partly because speaking assignments cannot be cheated.
    In my talk, I will (a) describe the background of Hokkaido University's online English language project, (b) expound on the learning experiences we provide to our students, (c) demonstrate technologies that enable various learning experiences, and (d) report on qualitative and quantitative learning outcomes.

人件費削減を狙って北海道大学は1学期間にわたる新入生全員向け英語オンライン学習を展開している(2007年度 2641名が履修)。
    費用削減が期待されたほど実現していない理由は2つある。(a)CALLシステム費用(機器やソフトウェアの調達と保 守、教材開発、担当者訓練の費用)が 高額かつ継続する。(b)大学1年は、大学受験対策といった受動的な学習習慣から、大学にふさわしい自律型学習習慣に移 行する過渡期であるので、教員や TAの対面指導がないと学習方法が分からず孤立してしまう学生が少なくない。
    費用削減以外の側面では次の3方向で成果をあげつつある。(a)教材と学習体験を可能足らしめる要素技術の開発。(b) 対面学習(非オンライン学習)の1教室あたりの学生数の抑制。(c)学習効果の向上。
    本企画が初ったころ行き当たりばったりに設計した学習体験を、受容能力と生産能力の均衡を目標に、学習意義があり指導可 能な形態に統合しつつある。教員か らの個別指導が少ないオンライン学習において生産能力を高める要素技術を開発している。発音指導を受けた経験がない学生 が多く、かつ、発音は「なりすま し」「代返」といった不正ができないので、発音課題に人気がある。
    本発表では、(a)北海道大学の英語オンライン学習の背景を説明し、(b)学生に提供するさまざまな学習体験を解説し、 (c)学習体験を可能たらしめる技 術を実演し、(d)学習効果の質的量的向上について報告する。


Goh Kawai is an associate professor of EFL and spoken language processing at Hokkaido University since 2003. He implements computer systems for learning spoken language, particularly non-native pronunciation skills. Prior to arriving in Sapporo, he conducted research and/or taught at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, SRI International, the University of California Santa Cruz, and the Oregon Health & Science University. Goh has a BA in linguistics (University of Tokyo), an MA in educational technology (International Christian University), and a PhD in information and communication engineering (University of Tokyo).  Academic association memberships include ACL (Association of Computational Linguistics), ASA (Acoustical Society of America), ASJ (Acoustical Society of Japan), CALICO (Computer Assisted Language Instruction Consortium), IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers), IEICE (Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers), IPSJ (Information Processing Society of Japan), ISCA (International Speech Communication Association), and PSJ (Phonetic Society of Japan). Goh enjoys aviation (private pilot airplane single engine land and sea), amateur radio (callsign N6UOK), way of tea (urasenke daien-no-sou and hikitugi), cycling, kayaking, and snowshoeing. His email address is goh at kawai dot com, and his web site is http://www.kawai.com/goh/.  
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Workshop & Presentation Summaries
CALL Workshop 2007

Session I:  Morning Workshops   10:10 – 12:15
1.   Moodle Training Workshop--Three Levels, Peter Ruthven-Stuart, Eric Hagley, Don Hinkelman
Moodle is an interactive website useful for any language learning class.  It is an open source (free) learning management system that can be a one-stop location for giving online quizzes, handling email announcements to students, providing handouts for download, and publishing protected student blogs, chatrooms, forums, wikis, or glossaries.  This workshop will train teachers at three levels--for beginners, intermediate and advanced users of Moodle.  Teachers will make their own courses in a Moodle site and can use that site freely with their students after the workshop.     
    Level 1—Absolute Beginner Moodle Teachers     Don Hinkelman
For teachers who have never tried Moodle and would like a basic introduction to its features, this will be a helpful session to determine if Moodle would be helpful for your classes.  Even teachers who have never used computers for language teaching may find it useful to see how discussion forums, blogs, chatrooms, surveys, online quizzes and other interactive activities can make livelier learning programs and streamline management of assignments, grades, and materials.
    Level 2—Somewhat Experienced Moodle Teachers     Eric Hagley
For teachers who have tried Moodle and know a little about the activities and modules, this is a good workshop to expand the types of activities you are using.  For example, Hot Potatoes is popular software used to create a number of unique types of quizzes that language learners enjoy—such as drag-and-drop or matching exercises.  We will teach you how to get hot potatoes up and running, how to create quizzes, and how to upload them to the net. Please request the kind of activity you would like to do and we will lead you step-by-step in the process.
    Level 3—Experienced Moodle Teachers     Peter Ruthven-Stuart
For teachers who are skilled with Moodle and want to expand their content and try optional (non-standard) modules & blocks, this session will be ideal. In this workshop, participants will be shown how to begin populating their course with content, and how to design their students' online experience for optimum results. The main points that will be covered are:
-  Course formats & settings
-  Uploading 'digital objects'
-  Grading & Scales
-  Quizzes and Exams
-  Constructing pedagogically sound 'Learning Units'
-  Sharing Moodle course material
 - Optional Modules (Feedback, Project, Exercise, PHPMyAdmin & other mods and blocks)

    Peter Ruthven-Stuart teaches at Future University–Hakodate, and has been using CALL since 1997. He has been using Moodle since 2003 and now runs two Moodle servers in his university, He is especially interested in the design process of content creation and how the design of online activities can foster autonomous learning.
    Eric Hagley now works at Muroran Institute of Technology. He has worked at Otaru Junior College and Hokkai Gakuen University. He has used computers to link his students with students in other countries in addition to a variety of CALL related applications.
    Don Hinkelman teaches at Sapporo Gakuin University and uses online Moodle activities with his face-to-face classes to provide a “blended” approach to all projects and topics.  Don serves as a moderator for the Moodle for Language Teaching community and the Hokkaido-area Englishforum support group for Moodle.

Session I:  Morning Workshops   10:10 – 12:15
2.   Video Editing: 'Mix and Mash', Bob Gettings
No camera? No movies? No problem! JumpCut, JayCut, Google, YouTube, EyeSpot – in the last year more and more online video editing services have sprung up. With many of them you can use resources on the web even without having a camera or video of your own to mix your own “original” video. This workshop will compare the pros and cons of the main services and we will take a look at one or two archives of online public domain or creative commons sites for free video and graphics. Then we will create our own video online using graphics, online movie clips, cameras, captions and BGM.
    Bob Gettings has been learning and teaching with computers since he met his first Macintosh in1984.

Session I:  Morning Workshops   10:10 – 11:00

3.   Transforming a Course in English Phonetics with Moodle, Suzanne Yonesaka 
This presentation reports on the development of an on-line independent study component for an English Phonetics course taught in English at a Japanese university. The component was created through Moodle, a freeware CMS. The purpose of the component was to provide students with an opportunity to review important concepts in phonetics and to become familiar with the International Phonetics Alphabet (IPA). Challenges included (1) implementing the module in a regular classroom environment with first-year students who were technological newcomers, (2) incorporating IPA and audio files, and (3) determinin g whether the on-line interactive quizzes actually increased student understanding of basic principles in phonetics as measured by an end-of-term exam. In meeting these challenges, the underlying pedagogy of this English Phonetics course was affected and the course was transformed in unexpected ways. The handout includes detailed technical “Moodle recipes” for making IPA flashcards, for recording audio files and adding them to quizzes, and more. This presentation will be useful for instructors who would like to enhance any course with on-line audio.
     Suzanne Yonesaka is professor in the Faculty of Humanities at Hokkai Gakuen University. Her current research focuses on teacher use of students' L1, and on the beliefs and dilemmas of student teachers.
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Session I:  Morning Workshops   11:05 – 12:00
4.    Making Listening Activities for Moodle with Audacity, Ian Munby  11:05--12:00
    This presentation will demonstrate how to:  (i) record sound files with the open-source software Audacity, (ii) upload these files to your Moodle site, and (iii) make accompanying listening quizzes on Moodle. This project was motivated by the need to provide homework assignments for two groups of Intermediate level college students enrolled in one-semester content-based courses in British studies. With the aim of providing students with additional listening practice and cultural knowledge, I recorded a series of weekly “lecturettes” related to various aspects of British culture and designed weekly listening quizzes with supporting vocabulary learning activities. This is my first experience with creating course materials with Moodle and I will attempt to show how easy it is in the hope of encouraging other teachers, even confirmed technophobes, to follow suit.
    Ian teaches at Hokkai Gakuen University and has a special interest in materials design and the teaching and learning of vocabulary.

Session II:  Keynote Presentation  1:00—2:10
5.   「北海道大学における大規模英語オンライン学習 」 河合 剛 (北海道大学 外国語教育センター)
  Large-scale Online English Language Learning at Hokkaido University
        Goh Kawai: Hokkaido University, Center for Language Learning

    Seeking to reduce personnel costs, Hokkaido University implemented a one-semester, wholly online English language course for the entire freshmen class (2641 students for the 2007 academic year).  The hoped-for financial savings are not being realized for two reasons: (a) CALL system costs (hardware and software acquisition and maintenance, courseware development, and staff training) are substantial and recurring, and (b) full-time instructors and teaching assistants need to personally assist students transitioning from passive, entrance-exam-oriented learning to proactive, independent, academic learning.  We are achieving results, however, in three directions: (a) developing courseware and enabling technologies, (b) reducing class sizes of instructor-led courses, and (c) improving learning outcomes. In my talk, I will (a) describe the background of Hokkaido University's online English language project, (b) expound on the learning experiences we provide to our students, (c) demonstrate technologies that enable various learning experiences, and (d) report on qualitative and quantitative learning outcomes.
    人件費削減を狙って北海道大学は1学期間にわたる新入生全員向け英語オンライン学習を展開している(2007年度2641名が履修)。費用削 減が期待され たほど実現していない理由は2つある。(a)CALLシステム費用(機器やソフトウェアの調達と保守、教材開発、担当者訓練の費用)が高額か つ継続する。 (b)大学1年は、大学受験対策といった受動的な学習習慣から、大学にふさわしい自律型学習習慣に移行する過渡期であるので、教員やTAの対 面指導がない と学習方法が分からず孤立してしまう学生が少なくない。費用削減以外の側面では次の3方向で成果をあげつつある。(a)教材と学習体験を可能 足らしめる要 素技術の開発。(b)対面学習(非オンライン学習)の1教室あたりの学生数の抑制。(c)学習効果の向上。本企画が初ったころ行き当たりばっ たりに設計し た学習体験を、受容能力と生産能力の均衡を目標に、学習意義があり指導可能な形態に統合しつつある。教員からの個別指導が少ないオンライン学 習において生 産能力を高める要素技術を開発している。発音指導を受けた経験がない学生が多く、かつ、発音は「なりすまし」「代返」といった不正ができない ので、発音課 題に人気がある。本発表では、(a)北海道大学の英語オンライン学習の背景を説明し、(b)学生に提供するさまざまな学習体験を解説し、 (c)学習体験を 可能たらしめる技術を実演し、(d)学習効果の質的量的向上について報告する。
    Goh Kawai is an associate professor of EFL and spoken language processing at Hokkaido University since 2003. He implements computer systems for learning spoken language, particularly non-native pronunciation skills. Prior to arriving in Sapporo, he conducted research and/or taught at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, SRI International, the University of California Santa Cruz, and the Oregon Health & Science University.

Session III:   Afternoon Presentations  2:15—3:00
6.   「音声ソフトの可能性:eラー ニングコンテンツ作成における音声ソフトの利用価値 川名 典人  札幌国際大学
    eライニングのコンテンツを作成するには多大な時間が必要となる。特に音声の録音は大変である。もし英文スクリプトの録音をネイティブの発音 に近いクオリ ティで音声ソフトを利用して処理することが出来れば多大なる時間の節約となる。このプレゼンテーションでは1)現在入手可能な音声ソフトの紹 介 2)eラーニングコンテンツ作成に利用可能なクオリティ 3)音声ソフトを利用したコンテンツ事例の3点に関して説明する。
"Machine-made Voice vs. Human Voice"
    Nowadays e-Learning is so popular that almost every higher educational institute has introduced it in its own way. As for Japanese English teachers, however, it is sometimes troublesome to find an appropriate English speaker in order to produce script recording. In such a case, a machine-made voice reader could work perfectly. Thanks to technology improvements, it can read English script as naturally as a human does. In this presentation, first the quality of both the machine-made voice reader and human voice is carefully compared to see if such a machine voice software can substitute for the human voice. Secondly, the application of such software will be discussed, and its credibility as sample sound for vocabulary or English sentences will be evaluated. Finally, sample e-learning content which includes this machine-made voice will be shown.
    Norihito Kawana teaches computer-based English courses at Sapporo International University. He is a coauthor of CD-ROM-based texts, This is Media.COM (Seibido2002), Click for Better English (Nan-Un-Do2004), and Time to Train Yourself (Seibido2006).  (Bilingual:English/Japanese)                                               

Session III:   Afternoon Presentations  2:15—3:00
7.     Using Social Network Sites for CALL Activities, B. Bricklin Zeff
In this presentation I will describe and demonstrate how I use Social Network sites along with a textbook in a CALL based topics course called English and the Internet. The objectives of the course are to get the students more comfortable with using the Internet in English and navigating through English language websites. I found an appropriate textbook in order to have a class based text but I used the Internet extensively to generate activities for the class. There are many free Social Network sites on the internet that are perfect for allowing students to develop writing skills and get experience navigating through various levels of internet based tasks. Many teachers may have second thoughts about using these sites because of the potential for privacy violations. By following a few simple guidelines it is possible to provide a class with a safe environment for navigation through these sites. I will demonstrate these guidelines and describe the course with its objectives.
   Bricklin has been teaching in Japan for 20 years. He is currently the coordinator of the English Language and Culture Department at Hokkai Gakuen University. He has an MA in Applied Linguistics and his area of research is Sociopragmatics.   
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Session III:   Afternoon Presentations  2:15—3:00
8.      Student-generated Video in the EFL Classroom--TV Commercials, Joseph Booth
Television, for better or for worse, plays a major role in Japanese culture, particularly among students - instant entertainment at the push of a button. Interspersed throughout the various programs, however, are the ubiquitous TV commercials that the typical viewer finds of little value. But let’s look for a moment at the educational possibilities of these otherwise distracting interludes: by taking a psychological approach to analyzing TV commercials, we teachers are able to tap into our students’ higher order thinking skills, as well as exposing students to higher end vocabulary; by engaging in a co operative effort to produce a TV commercial of their own, we promote collaboration, a skill which can be carried over into the real world; students’ computer skills are enhanced during the process of editing and networking; and by entrusting our students to create (with very expensive equipment, mind you) their own video productions, we build in them a sense of responsibility and empowerment. This workshop aims to introduce the concept of media studies in the EFL classroom, and to encourage participants to explore their own artistic facilities regarding TV commercial development. There will also be a short exhibition of student-generated TV commercials. Workshop will be presented in easy to understand English.
   Joe is a teacher at Sapporo Gakuin University and Hokusei Gakuen University and Girls' High School. He is interested in teaching methodology and language development, as well as elements pertaining to the human side of teaching, such as student self-esteem.

Session III:   Afternoon Presentations  2:15—3:00
9.    Moodle's New Project Module, Andy Johnson
Succinctly, the multi-phase project module allows students (individually or in groups) to brainstorm topics, sign-up for one they like, upload a file or files (i.e. PowerPoint, Word documents, movie clips, pictures, etc.) of their work, and then allow for both teacher and student peer-assessment. The project module for Moodle, initially the brainchild of Don Hinkelman and Thomas Robb, has grown dramatically since it began development several years ago. Student testing with the module began in the spring semester of 2007 and many improvements have been implemented this summer based on the experience. The revisions made were aimed at simplifying use and allowing for greater flexibility. This presentation will demonstrate how to install and use this module, including examples of its use during the spring of 2007, and give the audience hands-on experience using it.
    Andrew Johnson has been teaching EFL in Japan for over 10 years and currently teaches English communication at Sapporo Gakuin University. His primary interest is in exploring new directions for CALL development and implementation. He is also the creator of English Trailers (http://www.english-trailers.com).

Session IV:  Afternoon Presentations  3:05—3:50

10. 「One Year-Four Phase Plan for Improving Skills through Presentations」三角 美樹     札幌啓北商業高等学校
プレゼンテーション活動を取り入れた外国語指導は、「読む」「書く」「聞く」「話す」の4技能をバランスよく向上させる。札幌啓北商業高 等学校では、年間 を通した自己表現能力を高めるための4つのプロジェクトを計画し、1年生全員に指導した。本発表では、2006年度に実施した各プロジェ クトの指導方法・ 生徒の原稿・作品・アンケート 調査結果・プレゼンテーション能力を高めるために自主制作したビデオ教材を紹介する。また、2007年度春季指導における改善点・語彙算 出増加率などを報 告する。 
    Project-based English learning covers a wide range of material, such as (a) reading and writing through creating content, and (b) listening and speaking through oral presentations. We designed four consecutive project-based activities that span one school year (senior high school oral communication class): (1) "Self-Introduction" reviewing verbs and subjects, (2) "Describing the pictures" emphasizing adjectives and adverbs, (3) "Simulated newscaster" highlighting wh questions and answers, and (4) "Japanese Culture" practicing discourse markers. These four inter-related, incrementally challenging projects provide students with presentation and critiquing skills. Step-by-step activities enable speaking and writing confidently. Students enjoy expressing themselves using words, phrases, and structures that they learned. Documenting teaching procedures allow multiple teachers to coordinate instruction of over 200 students. We developed various courseware such as a "Presentation do 's and don'ts" video (demonstrations of good and bad presentation skills) that were adopted by other local high schools and a university. Our conference talk will describe improvements that increased words and sentences produced by students during 2007 spring semester. We will show our teaching material, students’ drafts, posters, video clips, and results of student surveys.
   Miki Misumi teaches at Sapporo Keihoku Commercial High School. She conducts experimental research on cooperative learning, communicative activities and CALL classroom use and design at Hokkaido University graduate school. (Bilingual:English/Japanese)

Session IV:  Afternoon Presentations  3:05—3:50
11.    Web 2.0: From Consumers to Creators, Peter Ruthven-Stuart
Web 2.0 technologies are changing the way people interact with the Web. Traditionally, people have been passive consumers of web pages. In the past, interaction with the Internet at best involved filling out forms or clicking on hyperlinks. However, as new technologies have emerged, the level and quality of interaction has increased. Web 2.0 has further altered the relationship between Internet content and consumers by making it easy for everyone to publish.   This democratization of the Web has important implications for language teaching. In the 1990's, teachers primarily used the Internet as a source of texts. If they wanted to play a more participatory role, they had to learn how to create their own web pages, and discover how to upload their creations to the Internet. Now, however, not only teachers, but also students can easily be the creators of content.    In this presentation, the audience will be shown how Web 2.0 technologies can be integrated into language education. In particular, it will be demonstrated that such technologies have the potential to make language study far more student centered. Some of the technologies that will be spoken about are: Blogs (Blogspot), Movies (YouTube), Photocasts (Flickr), and Wikis (pbwiki).
   Peter Ruthven-Stuart teaches at Future University – Hakodate, and has been using CALL since 1997. He has been using Moodle since 2003 and now runs two Moodle servers in his university, He is especially interested in the design process of content creation and how the design of online activities can be enhanced to foster autonomous learning.

Session IV:  Afternoon Presentations  3:05—3:50
12.    Using Online Forums to Augment Discussions, Rob McGuire [cancelled]
With the increase in CALL systems at colleges and universities around Japan and with an increasingly digital workplace and society, familiarity with computers has become a must. However, many classes that use computers as part of the curriculum tend to focus more on the computers than their actual use in content area instruction. One way to balance the need for computer familiarity and an emphasis on content area instruction is to use posts to online forums as a continuing homework assignment.   This presentation will include information on using simple online forums such as the Moodle forum feature as a way to expand on topics from classroom lectures and discussions. In addition the presentation will cover methods of evaluating forum posts, ways to motivate your students to post, and related issues such as setting up and maintaining the forum website.
    Rob McGuire has been teaching at Hokkaido Musashi Women's Junior College for the past ten years. His research includes drama in ESL and ways to improve students' conversations and discussions. His technical ability with computers is limited to knowing where the "on" button is.

Session IV:  Afternoon Presentations  3:05—3:50
13.     Monitoring Student Responses to a Blended Language Learning Project-based Approach, Will Kay
The presenter will outline salient observations made from a recent collaborative action research study where students used wireless laptop computers to facilitate language learning tasks in a traditional classroom environment. This study was designed to monitor student reponses to a blended language learning project-based approach within a Japanese EFL context. The results of the study will be summarized with a discussion on the advantages and challenges of implementing a blended language learning initiative into a university-level curriculum for non-English majors.
    William Kay is an English language instructor at Sapporo Gakuin University. He has recently completed his Master of Applied Linguistics (TESOL) from Macquarie University in Australia. His area of research is student involvement in blended language learning environments within EFL contexts. He is currently researching Japanese student involvement within an international Epal project amongst students from Laos and Canada.

       
Session V:  Short Presentations/Case Reports  3:55—4:25
14. 「学 習管理システム(LMS)を使用しない複合型授業」 川名  さなえ  札幌学院大学
昨 今、多くの大学で学習管理システム(LMS)が導入され、それを 活用する教員も増えてきている。しかしながら、全ての教員がその環境にあるわけではない。報告では、LMSを使用しないで、eラーニング と対面授業を行う 複合型授業(blended language learning)の2例を紹介する。一つはテキストの出版社が提供する無料ウエブサイトを利用しての授業で、一年生を対象に行ってい る。2つ目は2年生 を対象に、DVDとブログ上のeラーニング用の問題を用いた授業を紹介する。これは無料のブログのサイトと語学学習用のソフトを用いて、 簡単にeラーニン グ用のシステムを作成したものである。この複合型授業のアプローチは、学生に、より多面的且つ効果的学習の方法を提供している。その有効 性については学生 からも評価を得ている。       
 The number of the teachers who access to a server installed Learning Management System (LMS) is increasing steadily. However, not every teacher can do so because of his or her environment. In this presentation the presenter will show one of the ways to solve such a problem; without depending on LMS in an institutional server, productive blended language learning classes using both e-learning method and face-to-face approach in class are possible.   This presentation introduces two classes; one is a freshman general English class using a free language learning web site provided by a publishing company of textbooks and the other is a 2nd year university class using both DVD and the blog-based activities for e-learning in a CALL room. A free blog site and a language practice software were simply used to establish the e-learning system. This multiple approach for language learning gave both the students and the teacher in a class more comprehensive and communicable activities. Some good responses from students support the significance of this approach.
    Sanae Kawana is currently teaching English at several universities. She is also doing a research for PhD at Queensland University of Technology, Australia.

Session V:  Short Presentations/Case Reports  3:55—4:25
15.   Textbooks? No! Blended CALL for EFL Conversation Classes, Bob Gettings
Throw away the textbooks? I’ve been experimenting for the last five years with teaching conversation classes based on student surveys, short topical reports, longer presentations, online video self-analysis and peer-analysis of presentation skills, English karaoke, diary writing that blend the use of in class speaking activities backed up by web-based study or support. This presentation will take a “my share” approach to explaining some class activities, web based activities and class management approaches that allow the teacher to become a coach and let students learn at their own pace.
    Bob Gettings has been learning and teaching with computers since he met his first Macintosh in1984.
 
      
Session V:  Short Presentations/Case Reports  3:55—4:25
16.   Using Questionnaires in Moodle to Conduct Class Surveys, Martin Meadows
The questionnaire module in Moodle allows teachers to build their own online classroom surveys for feedback or research. This presentation demonstrates how to use the module to create and personalize survey questions and shows how a survey was conducted in one of the presenter's university English classes.  Biodata
    Martin's research interests are bilingualism, immersion language education, and CALL. Since setting up his own Moodle a little over one year ago, he has slowly been exploring the modules and broadening the range of activities he dares to include.
 
  

Session VI:  Short Presentations/Case Reports  4:30—5:00
17.    Using the Glossary Module in Moodle, Phil Radcliffe
The Glossary Module in Moodle can be a valuable component for learning vocabulary in any course you teach. These Glossaries can be created for courses by the students with teacher supervision. In this way you can have specialized vocabulary lists for each course you teach, or even a "Global Glossary" for the entire site. And Glossaries are not limited to only vocabulary items in English and you can add sound if desired. It is a great way to get students involved and gives them quick and easy access to a useful resource.
   Phil has been teaching at Sapporo University full-time since 1997 and living and teaching in Sapporo since 1984. His research interests include on-line Learning and teacher development.  He has taken part in many on-line teacher education courses about on-line education and teach all of my courses at Sapporo University as blended courses using Moodle.
  
 
Session VI:  Short Presentations/Case Reports  4:30—5:00
18.    How to Access or Set up a Moodle Site, Peter Ruthven-Stuart
Moodle is an interactive Virtual Learning Environment that is becoming mainstream. Teachers hear that it is a 'free program', so they tend to assume that it is fairly easy to set up and maintain. However, as a Learning Management System (LMS) that competes toe-to-toe with expensive proprietary systems, Moodle is a complex system and requires considerably more skill and time to install and maintain than a 'normal' computer application. However, despite its complexity, it is possible for even 'non-programmer teachers' to use Moodle.
    There are essentially four avenues that budding Moodle teachers can go down: hosting companies, Moodle partners, in-house servers, or free sites like this "englishforum". The presenter will explain the details and ramifications of these options. He will then describe the various factors that need to be taken into account when deciding which of these avenues to take. These 'factors' are: budget, time, technical knowledge, total number of users, and total number of concurrent users. The audience will also learn about how they can easily acquaint themselves with Moodle. For example, they can download and install the Moodle packages that have been designed for experimental purposes. Finally, they will be given access to 'Taiken Moodle' (http://taiken.petesweb.org/), a Moodle set up by the presenter.
    Peter Ruthven-Stuart teaches at Future University – Hakodate, and has been using CALL since 1997. He has been using Moodle since 2003 and now runs two Moodle servers in his university, He is especially interested in the design process of content creation and how the design of online activities can be enhanced to foster autonomous learning.

Session VI:  Short Presentations/Case Reports  4:30—5:00
19.    Teaching Issues in a Blended Classroom, Tim Grose
The presentation will show how the use of computers can enhance a content-based class. It will demonstrate three functions: material for testing, for supplementary material and for research. We will look at each of these and assess the advantages and pitfalls.
  Tim Grose is an instructor at Sapporo Gakuin University.

Closing:  5:00         Networking Party:  5:15  (Tsubohachi, Bunkyodai--approx. 3000-4000 yen)  
[Back to Top]

Previous Year's Schedule
CALL Workshop 2006

Welcome:  10:00—10:15     (refreshments and doors open at 9:30 am)

Session I:  Morning Workshops   10:15 – 12:15
1.    Computer Basics: Making a Website, Bill Pellowe
2.  「オンラインライティング自動採点システムCriterionの活用」 森越 京子 北星学園大学
3.    Making Movies,  Michael Vallance
4.    How to Fill Your Moodle Course: Content Design and Creation, Peter Ruthven-Stuart

Session II:  Afternoon Presentations  1:15—2:00
5.   「インターネットからの英語教材Aesop's Fablesの活用」 島岡 丘、ジョン・ベアマン   聖徳大学
6.     Versatile Video iPods as Classroom Tools, Bill Pellowe

Session III:   Afternoon Workshops  2:10—2:55
7.   「eラーニングによる学 習支援」 川名 典人  札幌国際大学
8.      Motivational Powerpoint Activities with Sound,  Will Kay & David Flenner
9.      Managing Your Course with Blogger, Bob Palmer
10.    English Trailers: An ESL/EFL Website Utilizing Movie Trailers, Andy Johnson

Session IV:  Afternoon Workshops  3:00—3:45
11. 「CALLシステムの利用にあたって−私の提案」 木村 純一郎   札幌国際情報高等学校
12.    Computers for Dummies,  Paul Gemmell, Andy Johnson & Tim Grose
13.    How to get Moodling: Introduction to an Interactive Learning Website, Peter-Ruthven Stuart
14.    English Story-telling with Paint Software, Joseph Booth

Session IV:  Afternoon Workshops  3:55—4:40
15. 「高校現場にお けるCALL教室活用の実践例」三角 美樹    札幌啓北商業高等学校
16.   Self-Publishing with Lulu: Print Your Own Textbook, Paul Gemmell & Don Hinkelman
17.   Webquests: Task-based Learning for Wired Classrooms, Bob Palmer
18.   Teacher-created Videos in EFL Classrooms, Joseph Booth

Closing:  4:45   [Back to Top]

 
Workshop & Presentation Summaries
CALL Workshop 2006



1.     Computer Basics Workshop: Setting Up a Website
        Bill Pellowe, Kinki University

Setting up a website can seem like a daunting task, with so many options to choose, acronyms to decode, and processes to understand.  The presenter will provide a beginner-level guide to understanding how to set up your own website with your own domain name on a commercial server. You'll receive step-by-step instructions to carry you through the entire process.  We'll start with some of the issues and options when choosing your own domain name. The second step is to get some space on a web server. Third, the presenter shows how to "connect" the domain name with your web server space. Fourth, the presenter will give an overview of how to actually set up your website with the least amount of technical know-how by installing free options such as Moodle (a popular way to create online courses for students), etc.

Bill Pellowe teaches full-time at Kinki University (Iizuka Campus, Fukuoka Prefecture). He has been involved with creating websites since 1996. One of Bill's projects is ELT Calendar (www.eltcalendar.com), which lists workshops, presentations and conferences for language teachers in Japan. [Back to Schedule]


2.   「オンラインライティング自動採点システムCriterion の活用」
     The Use of an Online Writing Evaluation System--Criterion
     森越 京子     & amp; amp; amp; amp; amp; nbsp;   北星学園大学短期大学部
     Kyoko Morikoshi, Hokusei Gakuen University & Junior College

インターネットやe-mailの普及、また、各種の英語技能テストでもライティングのセクションが導入され、ライティング力を伸ばすことも英 語教育の中で は非常に重要になってきていると考えられる。学生は、英作文などの授業を通して英語を書く機会を持つが、まだまだ十分な練習量とは言えない。 日本人教員に とっても、ライティングの指導は時間がかかり大変な部分も多い。今回の発表では、ETSが開発した英語ライティング教育支援プログラム Criterion の活用について、その取組を報告する。これは、英文法クラスでの実践であり、学習した英文法知識をライティングの中で意識しながら使うこと で、文法知識の 必要性を再確認されると共に、英語ライティングの学習の機会を増やし、ライティング能力を高めるような環境を整備することを目標としている。 また、このプ ログラムに対する学生の反応についても報告する。

Kyoko Morikoshi teaches at Hokusei Gakuen University and Junior College.  She is a member of the JACET Hokkaido Chapter -- CALL Study Group and has used the writing software such as “Criterion” for over two years. [Back to Schedule]


3.     Making Movies
        Michael Vallance, Future University Hakodate

Making Movies will introduce participants to the basics of digital movie making.
•    Planning a story.
•    Recording the action.
•    Editing the movie.
•    Sharing the  outcome.
The instructor will provide hands-on practice of  the digital tools, within the time allowed.
This workshop is most suited to teachers who wish to use technology to devlop digital stories. Apple software, iMovie, will be utilised.  Participants should bring their own Mac notebook computer to fully benefit from the hands-on experience.  Up to five Mac notebooks will be provided on site, so if you would like to use one, please send an email to the conference program chair before October 21st to reserve one (first-come, first-serve basis).

Michael arrived at Future University one year ago. He previously trained teachers in Singapore to use digital technologies in informed ways. He is the co-author of -Using IT in the Language Classroom-, Longman.  His personal aim is to rid the world of digital mediocrity.   [Back to Schedule]


4.    How to Fill Your Moodle Course: Content Design and Creation
       Peter Ruthven-Stuart, Future University Hakodate

Moodle is a wonderful addition to the arsenal of 'free' tools available to teachers wishing to practice CALL. One of the main attractions of the system is that it takes care of the technical matters of administration and content delivery, and so allows teachers to spend time on content creation. Because of its benefits, Moodle will undoubtedly become the choice of many educational institutions or departments within intuitions. Consequently, teachers will be increasingly faced with empty Moodle courses that they are expected to fill with content and then organize. The nature of this content will have a critical bearing on the success or failure of the online course. Yet, the process of task design and creation can be a time consuming and burdensome experience.  In this workshop, participants will learn how to use Moodle from a teachers point of view. They will be shown how to begin populating their course with content and design their students' online learning experience for optimum results. The main points that will be covered are:
Peter teaches at the Future University of Hakodate and has been using CALL since 1997.  He is especially interested in the design process of content creation and how the design of online activities can be enhanced to foster autonomous learning. [Back to Schedule]
 

5. 「インターネットからの英語教材Aesop's Fablesの活用
    無料で使える(¥0)の基礎と多読の決め手」
       島岡 丘、ジョン・ベアマン  聖徳大学
       Takashi Shimaoka & Jon Berman, Seitoku University

英語の国際通用レベルまで日本人の総合英語力を高めるためには、インターネットを活用することが考えられる。現在の最有力の候補はJ- call.orgの 無料サイトで得られるAesop's Fablesである。それに練習問題などを加えて付加価値をたかめたのが本教材である。その特徴は次の通りである: & amp; amp; amp; amp; amp; nbsp;  
1.全20編、各100語以内である。

2.未習語の英語の定義を3つの選択肢から選ぶ。
3.モデルリーディング(標準的米語)を何度でも聞ける。  
4.内容理解を多肢選択で理解度(満点100)を確認できる。  
5.日本語の解説を実費で入手できる。

Takashi Shimaoka is a Professor Emeritus of Tsukuba University and presently Professor of English Phonetics and Linguistics, at the Foreign Language Department, Seitoku University--聖徳大学外国語学科教授.  Jon Berman also teaches at Seitoku University and has developed English learning websites that combine listening, vocabulary, and reading skills.
[Back to Schedule]



6.    Versatile Video iPods as Classroom Tools
       Bill Pellowe, Kinki University

All of the activities demonstrated by the presenter could be done by teachers who do not have video iPods, but the presenter will claim that the video iPod is actually an affordable alternative to other technologies such as laptop computers. Using only a video iPod, the presenter will demonstrate a number of ways that this new tool can be used during lessons to deliver material to the classroom, whether that material is a basic stimulus, a supplemental support, or the main content of the lesson. This includes using videos, slides (which are more commonly associated with laptops and PowerPoint), photos and audio, including podcasts, the latest online trend. To save time, participants will not be asked to "be students" during the activies; instead, the activities will simply be modeled. A detailed handout with web-based supplementary materials will be provided.

Bill Pellowe teaches full-time at Kinki University in Fukuoka Prefecture. He has been involved with creating websites since 1996. One of Bill's projects is ELT Calendar (www.eltcalendar.com), which lists workshops, presentations and conferences for language teachers in Japan. [Back to Schedule]


7.    「eラーニングによる学習支援
       Introduction to eLearning-based Class Activities
          川名 典人     札幌国際大学
          Norihito Kawana, Sapporo International University

eラーニングは語学に対するモチベーションや習熟度に関して非常に有効であることが知られています。しかしながら、実際にeラーニングを利用 した語学の取 り組みをしている人はあまり多くありません。それは、eラーニングを行う環境が整備されていないことや、使用法でハードルが高いためであると 考えられてい ます。このワークショップでは、誰でも簡単に利用できるLMSソフトを使用して、eラーニングによる学習支援の方法を学びます。クラスの設 定、リンクの張 り方、カレンダーの使用法を確認し、クイズ、アンケート等を一緒に作ります。最後に1年間利用したサイトを参考にして、より実用的な利用法を 考察します。
E-Learning is both a powerful and useful tool to motivate students and improve their English. However, few teachers have yet to be involved in such computer-based learning. That is because having an environment of e-Learning is thought to be difficult and costly. For example, many of the teachers don 't  have their own server,  so they can 't install a LMS software. And such software costs more than they can afford. To solve these problems, the presenter has been using an inexpensive LMS software, called "Quia", which can create quizzes, surveys, homepage classes, and calendars. All of these activities can easily be done on the rental server.  In this workshop the presenter will show the people how to set up an e-Learning site; and then they will create their own e-Learning site, including quizzes, homepage classes, calendars, and surveys.  Finally, the presenter will show the participants some practical ways to use such e-Learning sites.

Norihito Kawana teaches computer-based English courses at Sapporo International University. He is a co-author of CD-ROM-based texts, This is Media.com (Seibido 2002), Click for Better English (Nan Un-Do 2004), and Time to Train Yourself (Seibido 2006). [Back to Schedule]  


8.    Motivational PowerPoint Activities Using Embedded Sound Recording
       William Kay and David Flenner, Sapporo Gakuin University

This demonstration will outline various PowerPoint activites that encourage students to approach English language learning in a dynamic and creative capacity.   Approaches for effectively implementing pair sound recording within a PowerPoint slideshow will be featured.  Special focus will be placed on the communicative potentials of developing PowerPoint sound recording projects in a CALL classroom environment.  These activities have proven to be both motivational and educational for English language learners at all levels. The activities that will be demonstrated this year involve creating theme-based storyboards to learn and practice English language target structures.  Additional PowerPoint activities from last year's demonstration (such as slideshow pair interviews) will also be featured.  Participants at this demonstration will be taken through step by step lesson plan models and will be given time to simulate a student sound recording process.  All participants, regardless of computer skill level, are encouraged to attend and enjoy this demonstration.

William Kay is an English instructor at Sapporo Gakuin University in Hokkaido, Japan.  His present teaching/research  interests involve incorporating communicative strategies in a blended learning environment.  David Flenner is an English instructor at Sapporo Gakuin University.  His present teaching/research interests are focused on Japanese culture studies and cross-cultural communication. [Back to Schedule]


9.     Managing Your Course with Blogger
        Bob Palmer, Hokkai Gakuen, Sapporo University, Sapporo International University

Blogs are great organizational tools for teachers of any subject and are extremely easy to set up and modify. A colorful, attractive blog can be your homepage for course syllabus, bulletin board, weekly or monthly schedule, and other essential information. And with a little HTML, you can add photos, links, and multimedia features such as forms, surveys, and even audio/video. Want more? Well, how about ease of maintenance?  Blogs are self-archiving, saving you the trouble. And the kicker: Many blogs, including my recommendation, are free of charge. In this hands-on workshop, participants will create a blog and add some of the features discussed above. You will also receive reference materials (including recorded tutorials and paste-in code) that will help make your pages sparkle.

Bob Palmer teaches EFL/CALL at Hokkai Gakuen University. He is interested in creating multimedia web environments. [Back to Schedule]


10.    English Trailers: A ESL/EFL Website Utilizing Movie Trailers
         Andy Johnson, Sapporo Gakuin University

At English Trailers (www.english-trailers.com), L2 students have the opportunity to study using short 45-second to 2-minute movie trailers (freely available on the Internet) in an interactive and stimulating online environment.  With over 130 movie trailers - each with up to eight pedagogically grounded activities that guide them through a series of pre-listening, listening and post-listening exercises  students get not only listening practice, but also reading, writing and speaking opportunities.  Furthermore, English Trailers utilizes database technology to provide numerous advanced features that allow users to become active participants in the site, personalize site characteristics, and record scores for graded activities. Teachers can also keep track of their students performance. In addition to covering the basic features of the site, one of the major changes in 2006 comes in response to requests from teachers who would like to use the site in classrooms with only a single central computer.  To satisfy their needs, several new features such as printable versions of materials and fonts that project well have been added.  The presentation will conclude with a discussion on how teachers can help contribute to the growing pool of shared resources found at English Trailers.  

Andy is interested in CALL development and implementation of interactive online materials using PHP/MySQL.   Current projects include increasinng students' extrinsic motivation during computer graded activities via virtual wagering and Moodle for Mobiles. [Back to Schedule]


11. 「CALLシステムの利用にあたって −私の提案」
         Suggestions for the Use of CALL Systems in Senior High Schools
        木村 純一郎   北海道札幌国際情報高等学校
         Junichiro Kimura, Sapporo Kokusai Joho High School

教員になって以来、ことあるごとに生徒らに“No bird soars too high, if he soars with his own wings.”というBlakeの言葉を送ってきた。しかし、専門である英語教育については、自分が彼らを支援しきれていたかという と、全く 自信が持てない。何かと制約の多い中で、彼らの好奇心と向上心を刺激するような『面白さ』を演出することは容易なことではないのである。 し かし徐々にで はあるが、状況は変わりつつある。特に技術の進歩によって授業の自由度は大いに高まった。昨今ではCALL教室の導入は、我々の創造力を大い に刺激する出 来事だった。今回はCALL使用に関して、高校の教育現場での実践事例を紹介するとともに、いくつかの提案をしてみたい。

Mr. Kimura teaches English at Sapporo Kokusai Joho Senior High School.  He is active in CALL and technology-related applications for language teaching. [Back to Schedule] 


12.    Computers for Dummies:  Question & Answer Discussion
          Paul Gemmell, Andy Johnson, and Time Grose, Sapporo Gakuin University

This question and answer session is the bare bones, first step in considering using computers in a classroom. It is meant for anyone who has every thought they would like to get started, but is hesitant about taking the first step, or who has questions about taking that step. If you are a computer dummy, like me, or computer savvy, but with no classroom experience, this is the place for you. It is also open to people who want to share their first classroom computer experiences and words of wisdom.

Paul Gemmell is a teacher at Sapporo Gakuin University, Japan. His current pedagogical interests are creating topic- and project-based course material texts.   Andy Johnson also teaches at SGU and is a dummy who despite incredible odds against him, managed to make a web site that iis perfect for other dummies.  Tim Grose is active with email class exchanges and proves teaching technologies can be adopted by anyone. [Back to Schedule]


13.    How to Get Moodling: Introduction to an Interactive Learning Website
         Peter Ruthven-Stuart, Future University Hakodate

Moodle is an interactive Virtual Learning Environment that becoming mainstream. Teachers hear that it is a 'free program', so tend to assume that it must also be fairly easy to set up and maintain.  As a Learning Management System (LMS) that competes toe-to-toe with expensive proprietary systems, Moodle is complex system and requires considerably more skill and time to install and maintain than a 'normal' computer application. However, despite the systems complexity, it is possible for even 'non-programmer teachers' to use Moodle.  There are essentially three avenues that budding Moodle teachers can go down: hosting companies, Moodle partners, or in-house servers. The presenter will explain the details and ramifications of these options. He will then describe the various factors that need to be taken into account when deciding which of these avenues to take. These 'factors' are: budget, time, technical knowledge, total number of users, and total number of expected concurrent users. The audience will also learn about how they can easily acquaint themselves with Moodle. For example, they can download and install the Moodle packages that have been designed for experimental purposes. Finally, they will be given access 'Taiken Moodle' (http://taiken.petesweb.org/), a Moodle set up by the presenter.

Peter teaches at the Future University of Hakodate and has been using CALL since 1997.  He is especially interested in the design process of content creation and how the design of online activities can be enhanced to foster autonomous learning.
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14.    English Story-telling with Paint Software: Campfire Stories without the Camp
         Joseph Booth, Hokusei Gakuen Girl’s Junior and Senior High School

This workshop is about telling “campfire” stories in English while using Paint software.  Let’ face it: Microsoft Paint is not on top of the list as far as educational computer programs go. The kids love it, though. Why not use Paint as a catalyst to raise students awareness of communication strategies that every language user everywhere on the planet employs: story-telling techniques. Whenever we tell a story, even something as simple as a three-sentence past experience, we make use of certain techniques to gain the attention of our audience. Maybe we shout a bit here, gesticulate a bit there. This can be a major challenge for second language learners. By creating a computer-generated picture story, students are faced with the need to support those pictures with an interesting delivery, while at the same time being allowed to impress their classmates with their artistic ability, or lack thereof. This hands-on workshop is designed to influence teachers to motivate their students to become more captivating communicators, especially with regard to non-verbal communication. Even if students do not have it in them to become master story-tellers, they can at least become aware of the need to be more animated during everyday discussion. The workshop will be presented in easy-to-understand English.

Joseph teaches at Hokusei Gakuen Girls' Junior and Senior High School in Sapporo. The English department emphasizes a communicative approach to teaching and production of language by students. His research interests include linguistics, language development and acquisition, and teaching methodology, among others. [Back to Schedule]
 

15. 「高校現場におけるCALL教室活用の実践例」
         Building High School Students' English Abilities through a CALL System
         三角 美樹   北海道札幌啓北商業高等学校
         Miki Misumi, Sapporo Keihoku Commercial High School

札幌啓北商業高等学校では2年前のCALLシステムの導入以来、主に一斉授業の中でCALLシステムを利用している。教員からのワードやパ ワーポイントを 使った教材提示、生徒による課題作成・インターネットを使用した研究発表など、CALLならではの学習方法を日々実践している。本校における 「オーラルコ ミュニケーション」「リーディング」「プレゼンテーション」「ディベート」等での活用例の実際を紹介する。併せて課外活動(英語部)でのス ピーチ指導や電 子掲示板を用いた英語指導の例も報告する。

Miki Misumi teaches at Sapporo Keihoku Commercial Senior High School. She conducts experimental research on cooperative learning, communicative activities and CALL classroom use and design at Hokkaido University graduate school. [Back to Schedule]


16.   Self-publishing with Lulu:  Print your own textbook for 900 yen
        Paul Gemmell and Don Hinkelman, Sapporo Gakuin University

Do you have great materials that you wish you could publish?   Afraid that self-publishing requires lots of up-front money?  Do you know how to use simple word processing software?   If so, you may be ready for Lulu.  Lulu.com is an easy, online publishing service that will print your textbook for as little as 800 yen and mail it to your post box within weeks.   This presentation will demonstrate how an EFL teacher at a university in Hokkaido converted his Word files into three  textbooks that he printed and sold to students for less than 2000 yen each.  With low print runs, he and his co-author are able to constantly update and reprint new versions semester by semester of these topics--Travel English, English for Psychology Students, English for Child Development.   Paul will also explain step-by-step, how to prepare your Word file for upload and how to get an ISBN number for your textbook if you want to resell it on the open market.

Paul Gemmell is a member of the Materials Writers SIG of JALT and teaches English communication at Sapporo Gakuin University.  He is also a closet writer, publishing under the pen name, "Archer Munk".  Don Hinkelman also teaches at Sapporo Gakuin University and researches blended learning—how to combine print materials with online activities.  [Back to Schedule]

 
17.   Webquests: Task-based Learning for Wired Classrooms
        Bob Palmer, Hokkai Gakuen, Sapporo University, Sapporo International University

Just google "WebQuest" and you will soon discover thousands of stimulating online lessons created by teachers around the world. What is a WebQuest? According to SDSU Professor Bernie Dodge, the originator of the WebQuest concept, a WebQuest  "is an inquiry-oriented activity in which most or all of the information used by learners is drawn from the Web. WebQuests are designed to use learners ' time well, to focus on using information rather than on looking for it, and to support learners ' thinking at the levels of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation."  In this session, the presenter will introduce a WebQuest he created in collaboration with a language teacher in Australia, and relate his experience implementing the WebQuest with EFL students at the high school and college levels. He will also point attendees to a number of online sites that provide both examples and guidance for creating WebQuests that will enrich the learning experience for students and teachers alike.

Bob Palmer teaches EFL/CALL at Hokkai Gakuen University, Sapporo University, and Sapporo International University. He is interested in creating multimedia web environments. [Back to Schedule]


18.  Teacher-created Video in EFL Classrooms: Developing Metacognitive Skills
        Joseph Booth, Hokusei Girls’ Junior and Senior High School

Video can be a powerful tool in the EFL classroom if used correctly. By producing a teacher-generated, semi-authentic (planned, but not rehearsed) recording, teachers can provide learners with a colorful array of communicative input tailored specifically to learner needs. Further, video viewing lends itself to a more complete discourse analysis. For example, the worksheet question, ”How does Susan react to Joe’s advice? considers not only what Susan says, but also her body language and tone of voice. Discourse analysis, in turn, presents learners with the opportunity to develop their metacognitive skills by thinking and talking about communication rather than simply engaging in it. Also, in conjunction with a whole language approach to situated cognition, teachers who use video in the classroom have the advantage of compelling learners to acquire conceptualized knowledge. As such, key points of a lesson, like grammar or time-buying strategies, can be much more readily assimilated into learner communication strategies. Finally, teachers as producers and actors are presented with the possibility of incorporating amusing aspects into the recording which often allows learners to see the more human side of those teachers as opposed simply to stuffy language caretakers. Workshop will be presented in easy to understand English.

Joseph teaches at Hokusei Gakuen Girls' Junior and Senior High School in Sapporo. The English department emphasizes a communicative approach to teaching and production of language by students. His research interests include linguistics, language development and acquisition, and teaching methodology, among others.

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